Manitoba Falcon Cam Forum

News, Videos & Other Webcams => Birds in the News => Topic started by: maggieblue on May 04, 2009, 18:12

Title: News: Eagles
Post by: maggieblue on May 04, 2009, 18:12
Geriatric pair of bald eagles has new chicks

Posted: 24/06/2008 10:25 AM

They might be senior citizens in the bird world, but they haven't lost their libido. A pair of bald eagles at the Assiniboine Park Zoo who are in their 40s -- equivalent to 110 in human years -- had two new baby chicks.

"I think it's interesting to equate it to human years because it would be impossible to breed at that stage for humans," said Bob Wrigley, the zoo's curator who announced the hatching of the baby chicks on Monday . "They're so senior they were having trouble flying up to the nest box so they moved it to a lower area."

The eagles here in Winnipeg are grey-headed and the male is blind in one eye. Most eagles, though, don't even survive in the wilderness past 30, let alone produce offspring, Wrigley said.

The pair was donated to the zoo more than 40 years ago by Manitoba Conservation's Wildlife Branch and the Calgary Zoo. Before the pair could breed 23 chicks in 25 years, they first got to know each other during a nine-year love affair, Wrigley said.

"They mate for life and they're really good pals," he said. "I love to hear them call back and forth."

The last time the female's eggs actually hatched was three years ago, Wrigley said


http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/historic/32915599.html
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on October 28, 2009, 19:23
Trapper John the Bald Eagle

http://raptoreducationgroup.blogspot.com/

(http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o337/quintara2/August%202009/baldeaglerescuedfromtrap1a.jpg)  (http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o337/quintara2/August%202009/eaglerescued2a.jpg)

(http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o337/quintara2/August%202009/baldeaglerescuedfromtrap2a.jpg)  (http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o337/quintara2/August%202009/baldeagleraptoreducationoct281a.jpg)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on November 10, 2009, 19:54
Trapper John the Bald Eagle - Part 2

It is very good news that the trapped Bald Eagle has made great progress. He is still fighting pneumonia. That fact alone makes him still a critical case. We are trying hard not to get too excited! He has not had solid food or eaten on his own since admission. He has however gained 1 lb. 5 ozs. That speaks well of REGI staff that tube fed him liquid food and gave supportive around the clock care the past week. We are going slow on solid food, but he is eating beef heart strips.

He has started to flap those very battered wings. Keep those positive thoughts coming his way.


(http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o337/quintara2/August%202009/rescuedeagle1.jpg)  (http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o337/quintara2/August%202009/rescuedeagle2.jpg)
First meal on his own                                                       Being very cooperative about being weighed
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on November 13, 2009, 19:17
Trapper John the Bald Eagle - Part 3

I am delighted to say that he is still with us. He continues to make slow progress. The key word here is progress.

He has been a stellar patient and has the hearts of so many. Today for the first time, he was dismayed with me and showed it when I caught him up to bring him inside. He spend most of the day out in a flight with another Bald Eagle in recovery. It was too cold tonight to leave him out.

He is still in fragile condition, but he is less convinced of that that I am. His appetite is not been great. That is an additional concern. He has some heart problems, I think from the exhaustion of the three day trip down the Wisconsin River while wearing a muskrat trap on his foot. We will see if that resolves when he is completely recovered from his other medical problems. I am soaking his affected foot in hot water in the evening to quell the inflammation of the soft tissue. Soaking the foot of a Bald Eagle in a hot water bath is not an easy task. I am thrilled his condition is improving each day.

I hate to get too optimistic, but so far so good. The best part is he seems at peace with his situation and is taking this captivity thing in stride. He is fascinated with us and what we are doing. He is an exceptional eagle, that seems to be keeping a mental log on humans. Some members of the Medford Bird Club were able to observe his enormous sense of self and calm during their tour on Saturday. It seems a contradiction at times that we are not able to share some of these cases in person with the public. Our federal permits do not allow the general public to come into contact with the birds that will be released, unless it is incidental to care. The birds themself teach so much better than any human ever could.


I am hoping for the best for him. He has been through so much.

In the first pic below, he is with another recovering eagle. He is now able to perch, whereas when he was rescued he was unable to stand.

(http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o337/quintara2/August%202009/rescuedeagleatreginov131a.jpg)  (http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o337/quintara2/August%202009/rescuedeagleatreginov132a.jpg)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on November 24, 2009, 22:32
Trapper John the Bald Eagle - Part 4

Our patient "Trapper John", the Bald Eagle caught in a leg hold trap in late October has become an emotional favorite not only with REGI staff but with our facebook and blog public too. Our weather has been unseasonably warm this week so yesterday he was transferred to an outdoor flight. This is in anticipation of his eventual release. He has come a long way since he was admitted. Honestly, I never thought I would see the day when he was flying again as he is today. You might recall his wings were badly battered as he struggled to stay afloat during the three days he spend in the Wisconsin River. He is still not "out of the woods" and will come back indoors when the weather turns frigid later this week. For now however he is outdoors for the first time since he was admitted.

While all of our patients are special, this Bald Eagle is even more so than most. His is incredibly patient with us and his predicament. I wish I could share with everyone just how amazing he is. For the few folks that have seen Trapper John in person, you know exactly what I mean.

Physically, "Trapper" has not gained the weight I hoped he would. He still weighs 7lbs. 11ozs. That is significantly underweight for a male northern Bald Eagle and is disappointing. His foot is still quite swollen and tender. He still suffers from physiologic stress, but is making progress. I will continue to update you on his progress. If he makes it through the many hurdles left before he regains his full health, we will have to have a huge celebration. We keep our fingers crossed for the day his release to the wild becomes reality.


(http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o337/quintara2/August%202009/trapperjohnreginov241a.jpg)  (http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o337/quintara2/August%202009/trapperjohnoutdoorsnov241a.jpg)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on December 10, 2009, 22:01
Two females, one male bald eagle fight over mating nest

PALM HARBOR — He's everything she's ever wanted in a man: distinguished, a caretaker, a homeowner.

She'll do anything to get him, even if that means taking out his better half. That's exactly what the hussy tried to do Saturday, authorities said Tuesday.

No, this isn't a recap of Fatal Attraction, the famous 1987 movie starring Glenn Close and Michael Douglas. And the characters aren't people. This love triangle is playing out in the trees above a Palm Harbor neighborhood. The parties involved? Bald eagles.  According to officials at the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey in Maitland — eaglespeak for the hospital — the man-stealing flirt held the other bird down, plucked her feathers and almost killed her. The injured eagle weighed all of 9 pounds.

"Her chest looks like a Thanksgiving turkey — completely bare," said Lynda White, coordinator of the center's EagleWatch program. "She is beat up. She is just a mess."  No one knows if the male eagle was around at the time of the fight, but typically, mates don't come to one another's rescue, she said.

It all happened Saturday afternoon in the back yard of Russ and Becky Fernandes.  "My dog was barking like crazy out back," Russ Fernandes said. "I went out and looked. The eagle was out on the ground."  Bloodied and weak, she stood outside the lanai until he opened the screen door. Then she stumbled inside and into the pool.

He fished her out and notified the Suncoast Seabird Sanctuary, an Indian Shores bird rescue organization that later transported the eagle to the center in Maitland. It will be several months before the eagle's feathers grow back and the center releases her. That's a good thing. "She'd just get her rear beat up again probably," White said.

Reports of eagle fights increase this time of year. Nesting season, which started Oct. 1, doesn't end until May 15. During that time, the birds jockey for places to live. In Pinellas County, where development has paved over habitats as the eagle population has soared, the problem is even more acute.

"The birds in Pinellas are suffering from loss of habitat," White said. "That's why you have so many eagles there nesting on cell towers. It's crazy compared to the rest of the state. We have seen a steady increase in territory fights as population increases and territory decreases and I think that this is a classic example of that."

The offending eagle is still on the lam and has shown no signs of remorse. Three times since Saturday's nearly fatal fight, she has tried to move into the injured eagle's home, said Barb Walker, a local volunteer with the Audubon of Florida EagleWatch program and one of the first people Fernandes called.

She wants that nest, that house, that man," she said. Added White: "She's probably thinking to herself, 'Why should she go out and find a mate from scratch when she's found a ready­ made home for herself?' "

So far, the male eagle has rebuffed the young lady's advances. And now, they're going at it, too. Despite the domestic squabbling, she still wants him.  "She tries to fly to the nest and he won't let her in," Walker said. "He's fighting her off and chasing her out of the natal territory. It's a real drama playing out over there."

Drama seems to follow the injured eagle. Someone shot her in January 1996, fractured her right ulna and punctured her femur. She was so badly injured that the Audubon center kept her for two years while she recuperated and regained her strength. The center released her 6 miles northwest of Brooksville on Feb. 24, 1998.  "We hadn't heard from her since," the center's Dianna Flynt said in an e-mail Sunday to Walker.

White said the male eagle can only fend off the female's advances for so long. Eagles take turns incubating. While one sits on the eggs, the other feeds itself, returns to the nest and exchanges roles.   "Raising chicks is a two-parent job and this bird cannot continue to feed itself and keep the eggs warm," she said. "I wouldn't be surprised if he finally realizes this would be a lot easier if he had help. I'm thinking he's going to get really tired of this routine very quickly and she will move in."

"They live these soap opera lives," Walker said. "It's almost as if they were people."


http://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/wildlife/two-females-one-male-bald-eagle-fight-over-mating-nest/1055764

(http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af254/wingshigh/Buckeye/Peregrines/eaglestpetersburgloserinbattle.jpg)

Another link, with a video:  http://www.myfoxorlando.com/dpp/news/orange_news/120309-injured-eagle
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on December 17, 2009, 21:02
Trapper John the Bald Eagle - Part 6

The eagle rescued from a leghold trap back in October continues to improve slowly, and the prognosis is looking good for him to be able to return to the wild at some stage.  No updates on the blog, but the newsletter had this small update.

He has already come a long way from the day he was rescued:

(http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af254/wingshigh/Buckeye/Peregrines/trapperjohnwhenrescued.jpg)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on February 01, 2010, 20:22
Trapper John the Bald Eagle - Part 7

We have updates on our Bald Eagle patients. The photo below is "Trapper," the adult Bald Eagle that was caught up in a trap in October. He continues to improve. He does not yet have full movement of his toes on the left foot due to the swelling. He is using the foot, however, and we remain hopeful he will regain full use of his foot. It is a long process for the tissue and the nerves to repair in a compression or crushing injury.

(http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af254/wingshigh/Buckeye/Peregrines/trapperregi1a.jpg)

REGI has just released three of the eagles they have been caring for; details on their blog:

http://raptoreducationgroup.blogspot.com/
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on February 11, 2010, 20:39
Trapper John the Bald Eagle - Part 8

The Bald Eagle we call "Trapper" continues to improve. You can see his foot ( L.) is still swollen and not 100% functional, but he has not lost any toes and is using the leg well.

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2779/4350368436_2b51097023_o.jpg)

Another eagle from the town of Texas, who had been caught in a coyote trap, is also doing well:

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4054/4349621541_a0f7532a37_o.jpg)

We are cautiously optimistic about both of these eagles, but recovery will be an extended period, as not only the tissue has to mend, but also blood routes reestablished in the affected legs and feet, as well as nerves that were severely damaged.

http://raptoreducationgroup.blogspot.com/
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on April 20, 2010, 13:24
FORE! Bald Eagle Pegged By Errant Golf Shot
 
A South Florida man's bad golf shot downed America's bird
By TODD WRIGHT

Not even America's symbol of liberty can avoid attack from bad South Florida golfing.

Wildlife officials said an errant golf shot nearly ended the life of a young bald eagle that was flying across a golf course in Vero Beach late last month, according to TCPalm.com.  The 2-year-old bird was minding its own business flying across the Sandridge Golf Course when it entered a fairway and became the accidental target of a tee shot. The unidentified golfer was probably aiming for a different eagle, the one on his golf score sheet.  The golf ball hit the bird in the wing and witnesses said the eagle came crashing out of the sky, eventually hitting a tree before laying limp on the grass.  It suffered a broken wing and has since been recovering at the Treasure Coast Wildlife Center in Palm City. Vets say the animal is doing well.

No word on who the golfer was or if he yelled out "FORE!" as is proper bad golf shot procedure, but the incident is being ruled as an accident. It is illegal to attack or trap a bald eagle, which is federally protected as a threatened species.


http://www.nbcmiami.com/news/weird/FOUR-Bald-Eagle-Pegged-By-Wayward-Tee-Shot-91526599.html
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on May 03, 2010, 14:19
10 birds of prey found poisoned in Irish Republic

Ten protected birds of prey have been confirmed poisoned across the Irish Republic in recent weeks.

The birds included a golden eagle, as well as two red kites, two white-tailed eagles, three buzzards and a peregrine falcon.

One of the red kites had been released in Northern Ireland and was found dead in County Kildare.

The birds died after eating meat baits laced with pesticides, one of which is illegal in Ireland.

Two red kites and the peregrine were found dead in County Wicklow, the third red kite in Kildare, a golden eagle in County Leitrim, and buzzards in west Waterford, east Cork and County Donegal.

Within the last few weeks two white-tailed eagles were found dead near Beaufort, County Kerry.

Both eagles were said to be in excellent condition and had been surviving well in the wild for two or three years.

An investigation is being carried out by the Department of Agriculture and the Garda.

"The loss of a further two white-tailed eagles at this time is devastating," said Dr Allan Mee, manager of the White-tailed Eagle Reintroduction Project in Kerry.

"The older male could have been one of the first birds to breed in the wild in Ireland in over 100 years had it survived. Indiscriminate poisoning is literally killing our chances of re-establishing a population here," he added.

Fifty-five of the eagles have been released in Kerry since 2007. Thirteen of them have now been found dead, seven of them confirmed poisoned.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/northern_ireland/8658193.stm
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on May 04, 2010, 19:53
Sea eagle death in Kerry park brings total to 13

ANOTHER WHITE-TAILED sea eagle has been found poisoned in sheep-farming country in Kerry, bringing to 13 the number of birds lost since their release into the Killarney National Park three years ago.

Kites, falcons, eagles – golden and white-tailed – buzzards and other birds of prey reintroduced into Ireland have been lost in what the various bodies involved described in a joint statement yesterday as “a spate of poisoning”.  The latest bird found is the second male sea eagle in weeks to have been poisoned in the river Laune and Beaufort area near Killarney in the foothills of the Macgillycuddy’s Reeks, an area which eagles frequent in search of fish.  Both were poisoned by Carbofuran, a banned pesticide commonly used by farmers on dead carcasses to poison foxes and crows during the lambing season, laboratory tests revealed. They were about three years old.

Since their reintroduction, seven white-tailed sea eagles have been confirmed poisoned in Kerry, two are suspected of having been poisoned, one was shot and two others died from natural causes. A 13th eagle was shot in the North.  Just shy of a quarter of the eagles have now been wiped out.

Twenty more are due to be brought in from Norway this year as part of the five-year programme. The scientist in charge of the sea eagle project, Dr Allan Mee, said yesterday the continuing loss of eagles to poisoning had cast a shadow over the future of the ambitious programme.  There was huge support for the project among the public and it was strongly supported by tourism bodies. The problem rested with individual sheep farmers, according to Dr Mee, most of whom had now come around to the idea.

“The loss of a further two white-tailed eagles at this time is devastating . . . We know that eagles can thrive in Kerry if given the chance but indiscriminate poisoning is literally killing our chances of re-establishing a population here.”

In what has been described as the worst spate of poisoning in recent years, 10 protected birds of prey, including three red kites, two white-tailed eagles, a golden eagle, three buzzards and a peregrine falcon have been confirmed poisoned in the Republic. Two red kites and a peregrine were found dead in Wicklow, a third red kite released in Northern Ireland was found dead in Kildare, a golden eagle in Leitrim and buzzards in west Waterford, east Cork and Donegal (one of which recovered from poisoning). They were all poisoned by ingesting meat baits laced with Alphachloralose.

The Golden Eagle Trust is calling on the Department of Agriculture to initiate immediate farm inspections where poisonings occurred. The trust said the department had failed to ensure that farmers in receipt of direct payments from the EU for rural environmental protection and other schemes observe the law on the protection of birds of prey.


http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2010/0504/1224269640141.html

(http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af254/wingshigh/Buckeye/Peregrines/image002-102-1.jpg)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Cammie on May 14, 2010, 14:25
Touch and go for wind-wounded eaglets

It’s touch and go for two bald eaglets rescued when their nest west of Hyde Park blew down in a wind storm Friday night.  The two eaglets, thought to be about two months old, survived a 15-metre fall but suffered leg fractures requiring surgery, said Brian Salt of Salthaven Wildlife Rehabilitation. The two birds are in a protected aviary at the Mt. Brydges facility. 

Salt said leg fractures are very serious injuries for raptors such as eagles. “Their legs and talons are like their guns.” He said one of the birds will require a pin to repair a leg fracture.  In recent years other young eagles have been rescued with similar injuries and didn’t survive, Salt said.

Local resident Don Fairbairn was the first to see the nest was down. He’s been watching it as long as it’s been there.  “First thing I do every morning at seven is look at the nest,” he said.  Fairbairn called a friend at the Ministry of Natural Resources for advice. The friend said the eaglets would almost certainly be dead. But Fairbairn hopped on his ATV and headed across the fields to see what he could do.  When he got to the site, he found the eaglets in a tangle of underbrush.

“The important thing was they were alive,” Fairbairn said. With mama and papa eagle circling menacingly overhead, Fairbairn gathered the eaglets under his arms — “just like you do with a chicken.”

Surgery for eagles is highly specialized and costly. Salthaven will pay for the surgery but is dependent on donations to provide such care.  Bald eagles have been making a comeback in southern Ontario, but the numbers are still low. It’s estimated there are 20 nesting pairs in southern Ontario. Only 28 eaglets fledged in 2008.

Local businessperson Charlie Frank has been watching the Hyde Park birds closely for years. He’s watched the nest through his binoculars every day.  A big part of his business, Hyde Park Feed and Country Store, is wild bird feed and he has a special concern for the fate of the eaglets. He’s erected a sign in front of his store on Gainsborough Rd. encouraging people to donate to Salthaven.

The eagles have been returning to the nest for three years. Each year they add more material to it. Salt wasn’t sure of its exact size and weight of the next but said “it was about the size of a small car.”


http://www.lfpress.com/news/london/2010/05/12/13927776-lfp.html#/news/london/2010/05/12/pf-13926936.html[/color]
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: sheltiegirl on March 23, 2011, 09:59
Not sure if this is the right place but TPC can move it if I am wrong. And the story did not linger for long on the main page of the Toronto Star online but apparently birdy folk around Hamilton Ontario believe there is a breeding pair of bald eagles nesting in a marsh called Cootes Paradise . If this is true it will be the first eagles born on the north shore of Lake Ontario in 50 years. There are bald eagles in areas north of Toronto and near Peterborough 32 nests I think in total but this will be the first on the lake shore in a long time. I am not sure how to post a link and the story was so fleeting I had to use the search function on the main page to go back and check the details. Fingers crossed and I will keep watching for details. sg
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on March 23, 2011, 12:42
Think this is the story you saw Sheltiegirl ...


Bald eagles return to Lake Ontario shore
Jim Wilkes, Toronto Star Staff Reporter

Are a couple of American icons making babies in a Hamilton marsh?

If successful, the pair of bald eagles nesting in a tall white pine in Cootes Paradise just might be breeding the first homegrown young on Lake Ontario’s north shore in 50 years.  The majestic creature, whose wingspan is more than two metres, is the national bird and a patriotic symbol of the United States.

The eagles were first spotted in the wilderness area west of Highway 403 in 2009, when the male was too immature to reproduce, said Tys Theijsmeijer, head of natural lands for Burlington’s Royal Botanical Gardens.

“We’ve just been waiting for the immature one to graduate to adulthood,” he said. “In the interim they built a nest.”

Last year, the big birds moved to another pine tree in the area, so this year work crews cleared an area in a tree near a public viewing platform along the marsh’s boardwalk to encourage the birds to settle where naturalists could monitor them more easily.  But the eagles moved back to their original home last month, about half a kilometre from the closet vantage point.

“It’s nice to know they’re smarter than us,” Theijsmeijer said. He said no one really knows if the female has laid eggs yet, but bird watchers are keeping their fingers crossed.

“We’re pretty sure that if they were going to lay eggs it was in the past two weeks,” he explained. “So we’re looking at mid to late April to see little heads poking up in the nest.”

A hundred years ago, bald eagles were a common sight along Lake Ontario. But toxic pesticides slowly killed off most of the population.

“The water became polluted with DDT used in agriculture that washed off the land into the lake,” Theijsmeijer said. “The poison got into the fish, the birds ate the fish and it caused the shells of the birds to be thin and shatter. So we just ran out of bald eagles.”

DDT was banned in the United States in 1972 and in Canada in 1989, although its use had been restricted for more than a decade before that.  Theijsmeijer said that by 1980, only four bald eagle nests remained in southern Ontario.  He said there are now about 32 nests along the lower Great Lakes, including areas north of Toronto and near Peterborough.

“It’s been a slow but steady climb back,” he said. “We’re finally getting the big bird back to the big lake.”

The bald eagles at Cootes Paradise kept a low profile on Tuesday, hunkering down in their nest for long periods, making just a few forays out to sit in another tree before returning home.

“More often than not, they’re really not doing anything, unless they go hunting and you just see them circling,” Theijsmeijer said, manoeuvring an aluminum boat to give visitors a closer look."  He said he hopes efforts to clean up the area and make a nurturing habitat for the eagles will pay off. “Maybe 50 years from now the shoreline will be strewn with so many bald eagles that they’ll be commonplace once again.”



http://www.thestar.com/news/article/958893--bald-eagles-return-to-lake-ontario-shore
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: sheltiegirl on March 23, 2011, 13:01
Such a clever girl you are my dear, thank you very much.  ;D
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on March 23, 2011, 13:18
Aw! Exactly what happened to our beloved peregrine falcons! >:( Takes a looooong time for wildlife to make a "come-back".  :(  :'( But so glad to hear that these bald eagles are! :D

"A hundred years ago, bald eagles were a common sight along Lake Ontario. But toxic pesticides slowly killed off most of the population."

“The water became polluted with DDT used in agriculture that washed off the land into the lake,” Theijsmeijer said. “The poison got into the fish, the birds ate the fish and it caused the shells of the birds to be thin and shatter. So we just ran out of bald eagles.”

Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on April 17, 2011, 09:18
 Not sure if this is true......it was sent in a email  :-\  Love the pictures tho  :)

 FEEDING THE EAGLES
January of this year, 2011, the weather stayed so cold in St. Louis, Missouri and Alton, Illinois that the bald eagles were cruising over houses in hopes of a quick meal.
They could not access fish that were at the bottom of the river and had gathered together.
Some kind souls decided to feed the eagles so they would survive the cold spell.
They gathered fish and started feeding the group of eagles huddled on the shore.
The photos below show what happened.
A retired teacher took these photos in front of his home.
 
Incredible!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/61724336@N06/sets/72157626516419184/show/

Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on April 17, 2011, 10:04
Not sure if this is true......it was sent in a email  :-\  Love the pictures tho  :)

I'm not sure that the story is entirely true, rcf. :-\ My sister from Ontario emailed these same photos to me over a year ago. But they certainly are wonderful photos! :D
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: bcbird on April 17, 2011, 11:47
This quantity of eagles hanging around is a common natural sight near Courtenay on Vancouver Island.  We can count dozens on sand bars and beach areas close to the river outlet to the ocean.  An awesome sight! 
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: susha on April 30, 2011, 14:26
I was delighted to see that a new eaglet has hatched in the Hornby Island Nest!  There were two eggs being carefully tended by Mom and Dad Hornby. The first hatched on Apr.28th at 1:39 p.m.   :-* Everyone's anxiously awaiting the arrival of the second chick :) Chick #1 has been named "Alexandra" as the first chick to hatch is typically a female, according to the Hornby Island Eagle-cam forum ;D
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on May 21, 2011, 08:56
Love when this happens  :-*

Sidney Eaglet Rescue
http://www.hancockwildlife.org/article.php/SidneyEagletRescue2
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: susha on May 21, 2011, 09:25
So happy this turned out well :-*
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on May 21, 2011, 09:42
I heard this news was on CBC radio yesterday morning, with an interview with David Hancock. So glad that they were able to help the eaglet. :D That was quite the rescue attempt.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: irenekl on November 09, 2011, 07:32
FYI:  
This Week on NATURE on PBS tonight:

Jungle Eagle

Harpy eagles are the most powerful birds of prey in the world. Standing three feet tall, with a six-foot wingspan and razor-sharp talons the size of bear claws, these birds are the heavyweight hunters of the South American rainforest. They are the top predators in the jungle canopy, feeding regularly on tree-dwelling mammals like monkeys and sloths. But scientists know very little about harpy eagles because their numbers are few and their habitat is large. Hidden in the branches of the canopy, they are rarely seen, let alone filmed.

Jungle Eagle premieres Wednesday, November 9 at 8 p.m. ET on PBS
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: birdcamfan on November 09, 2011, 15:52
Cool. I thought it said "happy" eagles but reading on I realized there was likely nothing happy about a meeting with one of these giants! Thank you for the heads up.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: susha on November 09, 2011, 20:02
Thanks irenekl!  I just turned the TV on to record this show and it was already on, so got to watch the last 30 minutes or so.  What a great show and what a beautiful bird!  I'll be sure to keep my eyes open for more opportunities to view these eagles!
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on November 09, 2011, 21:22
Darn! I missed it!  >:( I'll bet it was very interesting. :)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: irenekl on November 10, 2011, 09:37
If you missed it......The NATURE episode on the Jungle Eagle airs again tonight on PBS at 1:00am (ch.3).  Technically that would be Friday, November 11th 1:00am

Harpy eagles are the most powerful birds of prey in the world. Standing three feet tall, with a six-foot wingspan and razor-sharp talons the size of bear claws, these birds are the heavyweight hunters of the South American rainforest. They are the top predators in the jungle canopy, feeding regularly on tree-dwelling mammals like monkeys and sloths. But scientists know very little about harpy eagles because their numbers are few and their habitat is large. Hidden in the branches of the canopy, they are rarely seen, let alone filmed.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: bcbird on November 10, 2011, 10:55
Happily, my husband had recorded it and we watched it later last night.

The film production is beautiful, set in the Orinoco rainforest, with amazing colours of wildlife and exotic soundtrack.  The narrator is experiencing thrills of his lifetime as he follows the development of a Harpy Eagle chick during its first year of life.  This is truly a stunning view into rarely seen areas of the rainforest canopy, starring a most ferocious family of raptors.  
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on November 10, 2011, 13:39
If you missed it......The NATURE episode on the Jungle Eagle airs again tonight on PBS at 1:00am (ch.3).  Technically that would be Friday, November 11th 1:00am...
Thank you, irenekl! I'm going to try to tape it so I can watch it sometime tomorrow. :)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: susha on November 10, 2011, 21:16
I just set the PVR to record it!  Thanks Irenekl!  Now I'll be able to enjoy the entire program :)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on November 11, 2011, 14:59
And I missed it again! >:( I was so tired last evening that I went to bed early and completely forgot about recording it. ::)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on January 05, 2012, 11:24
The title is technically correct but a bit misleading - no idea if that was intentional or unintentional ..

Feds propose allowing wind-farm developer to kill golden eagles
by James Eng, msnbc.com

(http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/j/MSNBC/Components/Photo/_new/120104-eagle-12p.photoblog600.jpg)
Shamil Zhumatov / Reuters

The federal government is proposing to grant a first-of-its-kind permit that would allow the developer of a central Oregon wind-power project to legally kill golden eagles, a regulatory move being closely watched by conservationists.

The Interior Department’s Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday released a draft environmental assessment that would allow West Butte Wind Power LLC to kill as many as three protected golden eagles over five years if the company fulfills its conservation commitments.

It’s the first eagle “take permit” application to be received and acted on by U.S. Fish and Wildlife under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. (“Take” means to kill, harass or disturb the birds, their nests or their eggs.)

The legislation, enacted in 1940, prohibits anyone from killing or disturbing any bald or golden eagles without a permit from the Interior Department.

Regulations adopted in 2009 enabled the agency to authorize, for the first time, the “take” of eagles for activities that are otherwise lawful but that result in either disturbance or death. In this case "taking" would be the killing of eagles hit by the wind turbines' huge blades.

Public comments on the draft environmental assessment of the Wind Butte project will be accepted until Feb. 2.

The permit, if ultimately issued, stipulates that there must be no net loss to breeding populations of golden eagles from the wind farm project. That means for every protected bird permitted killed, developers must contribute to conservation efforts for breeding them.

“Our goal is to maintain stable or increasing populations of eagles protected under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act," said Chris McKay, assistant regional director for Migratory Birds and State Programs in the Fish and Wildlife Service's Pacific Region.

"Regulations under the Act allow us to issue permits for activities that are likely to take eagles provided the activity is otherwise lawful and the taking is not the purpose of that activity, the take is unavoidable even though advanced conservation practices are being implemented, and the take is compatible with eagle preservation," McKay said in a press release.

California-based West Butte Wind Power LLC is proposing to build a 104-megawatt wind energy generation facility on ranchland in Oregon’s Deschutes and Crook counties, consisting of up to 52 wind turbines. Electricity generated by the project could power as many as 50,000 homes.

Conservation groups expressed cautious optimism at the government’s proposal to award the eagle take permit.

“This is a type of project where it’s appropriate for them to issue this kind of permit,” said Liz Nysson, energy policy coordinator with the Oregon Natural Desert Association She noted that only a small number of golden eagles are believed to be in and around the area where the wind turbines will be built.

“I say ‘cautious optimism’ because we fear that the agency is going to go forward and start issuing these permits … for a multitude of golden eagles every year, and that would be a bad use of the policy,” Nysson said.

It's not mandatory for wind-power projects to apply for the eagle "take" permits.

Kelly Fuller, wind campaign coordinator for the American Bird Conservancy, praised West Butte for being the first company to apply for one. She described the latest development as “precedent-setting,” according to the Governors’ Wind Energy Coalition, a bipartisan group of the nation’s governors dedicated to expanding the development of wind energy.

Fuller said the eagle permit process gives conservationists more opportunity to participate in the development process.

She said the conservancy group will ask Fish and Wildlife to extend its public comment period an additional 30 days beyond the Feb.  2 deadline, according to the Wind Energy Coalition.



Original news article: http://usnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/01/04/9952873-feds-propose-allowing-wind-farm-developer-to-kill-golden-eagles
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on January 17, 2012, 21:36
Rescuing a Bald Eagle on the Cowichan River

Uploaded by SteelheadVanIsl on Jan 16, 2012
During a Steelhead fishing trip down the Cowichan River we encountered an injured eagle that we rescued and gave to the raptor society in Duncan BC.

http://youtu.be/e086Gjp1_cw
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on January 18, 2012, 04:57
 :) An absolutely amazing rescue of this majestic eagle. These men remained diligent until they safely captured the eagle. They were in the right place at the right time. Their pride in their task is the pride we feel for them.  :-* :-*
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on January 18, 2012, 20:21
From the Pacific Northwest Raptors Facebook page. They have just posted this sad update:

Some of you may have heard of the eagle rescue by local fisherman yesterday. They did a great job rescuing an injured eagle on the Cowichan River from a boat! Gill, from PNWRaptors, went to meet them as they arrived on land. This morning the eagle was taken to the vet and had x-rays done. Unfortunately the wing break was too close to the joint to be pinned, and the eagle was euthanized. We are all feeling very sad, as it was obvious the eagle was an older adult that likely had a partner.

http://www2.canada.com/cowichanvalleycitizen/news/story.html?id=81e1112e-6b2f-4c1e-9ca6-350caf4504fb
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on January 19, 2012, 04:48
 :(  :'(
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Jazzerkins on January 19, 2012, 07:03
How very sad.  Nature can be so cruel sometimes. :'(
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: bcbird on January 19, 2012, 11:31
Thanks, RCF, for posting that followup article.
 
Though the story has a sad ending, I bet that experience of being with the bald eagle will never be forgotten by those fishermen.
The expression on the face of the fellow cradling the eagle, and the wonder and amazement in describing its size, are reminders of the majesty of these raptors.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on January 21, 2012, 11:20
What an amazing rescue! But very sad to read that the eagle could not be saved. :'(
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on March 07, 2012, 23:16
Some people just don't follow the rules or care about them  >:(

Registered eagle tree falls to a chain saw

http://www.canada.com/Registered+eagle+tree+falls+chain/6263134/story.html
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: bcbird on March 08, 2012, 16:21
Interesting article, RCF.   How sad it must have been to see the eagle pair circling in vain above their fallen nest tree.

That property owner sounds fairly unrepentant.  "There seems to be quite a little upheaval there doesn't there," he said. "I'm under advisement to have no comment." 

The article goes on to say:
"Section 34 of the BC Wildlife Act states that "a person commits an offence if they possess, take, injure, molest or destroy the nest of an eagle." A first conviction on a Wildlife Act violation can bring a fine of up to $100,000, one year in prison, or both."

Perhaps he will be in hot water soon. 
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on March 08, 2012, 20:34

Perhaps he will be in hot water soon. 

A very large fine may suffice, but it doesn't put the tree back. :(
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Jazzerkins on March 14, 2012, 07:25
This article was in the Free Press today -
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/life/faith/us-agency-agrees-to-allow-american-indian-tribe-to-kill-eagles-for-religious-purposes-142532705.html

I have never heard of Aboriginal peoples killing bald eagles as part of their "culture".  All my life I have been taught that Aboriginal peoples respected all nature and did nothing to harm animals, birds, etc.  I don't believe it is right to kill bald or golden eagles or any other living thing and call it "culture".
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on March 14, 2012, 20:38
Hmmm... That is a very strange article. Never heard of the killing of bald eagles to be an acceptable practice by anyone, legally or otherwise. :'(
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: cadria on May 22, 2012, 17:11
I just wanted to share this story with all of you in case you hadn't heard it.  There is a Bald Eagle cam in central Minnesota and, at the beginning of April, 2 chicks hatched.  This nest has had a rough time.  At the end of April, one of the chicks fell from the nest.  Sadly, he did not make it.  Then, a few days later, after a lot of rain and Mom doing some nestoration, Harmon, the remaining chick, got his wing stuck in a hole in the nest.  For 24 hours, we watched and waited and begged the powers that be to help him out. Finally, after a lot of consideration and obtaining a permit from their Fish and Wildlife Service, a man from the Raptor Center went up the tree to check out Harmon.  He checked him over and decided that he needed a bit of rehab, so he was taken off to the Raptor Center.  He was incredibly distressed from trying to get out and his injury had maggots on it!   :o  He did remarkably well and in just under 48 hours, they were able to return him.  Apparently, after that amount of time, it is very unlikely that parents will return to a nest.

Everybody watched and waited and prayed...and waited and watched.  He had been fed, but was pretty young to be taking care of himself.  We were all devastated when he had to spend that first night alone.   Then, as if all the prayers had been heard, just after 7:00 CST ( about 26 hours later), Dad just plopped down on the nest!!  It was the most glorious sight!!!  The volunteers had left cut up fish so that when the parents came back, they could feed him right away instead of having to go out and hunt.  Within about 5 minutes, Mom dropped down onto the nest.  Harmon was just delighted and squealing!!  They both started feeding him and stuffing him.  The parents have been so attentive.  Unbeknownst to us, the crew was on the ground, about 30 minutes away from going up and getting Harmon, as they did now want him to be alone another night with predators.  However, they saw the parents circling and held their breath and hoped and we were all rewarded....especially Harmon!

It was such a happy ending and while people might comment that we should let nature take it's course, my thoughts are that there is no reason a helping hand should not be offered out, especially since man causes loads of problems for animals.  :)

Anyway, here is a link to one of the stories and if you follow it, you can read the other blog stories.

http://theraptorcenternews.blogspot.ca/2012/05/what-amazing-finale-to-very-busy-few.html (http://theraptorcenternews.blogspot.ca/2012/05/what-amazing-finale-to-very-busy-few.html)

Here is the reunion video:

http://youtu.be/s0BsVUr8UT4 (http://youtu.be/s0BsVUr8UT4)

It was such a marvelous sight to behold.  Unfortunately for my mom, I was on the phone with her when Dad landed.  I yelled, "OMG, Dad's back!" into the phone. ....heh, heh...good thing we were on speaker phone! :)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: MayShowers on May 22, 2012, 17:42
What a wonderful story.  Brought a tear to my eye.  :)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: susha on May 22, 2012, 18:03
Thanks for sharing this story, Cadria!  Beautiful!!
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: birdcamfan on May 22, 2012, 19:55
Ah! What a nice thing to read. Thank you.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: allikat on May 22, 2012, 20:04
That was a beautiful story and heartwarming video! 
It certainly is wonderful to be able to give a lending hand, and then see that lending hand create a happy reunion!
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: irenekl on May 22, 2012, 22:15
Fantastic!  And I agree, help out sometimes.  Why not!
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on May 23, 2012, 19:50
Very beautiful story, cadria. Thanks for posting it. :) That is amazing that the parents returned.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on June 04, 2012, 21:42
An Incredible Eagle Rescue   :)

Maj received a call in the evening of May 29th about an eagle tangled in kite string in a tree in Royston. The eagle was at least 40' up and it became obvious that a tree climber was necessary. At 6 am the next morning everyone assembled to watch Steve Harding of Timberwolf Tree Service, in Campbell River, climb up and free the eagle. He did this on his own time, as he has done in the past, for other birds.

http://youtu.be/gMeuO1L6wuQ

Published on May 30, 2012 by MARSbirds
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: bcbird on June 05, 2012, 00:05
Thanks for the news link and video of the eagle rescue, RCF.
There is a Facebook page for the rehab group who took in the eagle after the rescue
There are some good photos and information about the progress of the eagle's recovery.

https://www.facebook.com/mars.comoxvalley (https://www.facebook.com/mars.comoxvalley)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on June 05, 2012, 06:05
Thanks bcbird,  I'm glad the eagle is doing ok!   8)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on July 07, 2012, 16:18
Axed eagle's nest rebuilt by B.C. residents   8)
Posted: Jul 4, 2012 9:38 AM PT

A pair of bald eagles is resting safely in their new nest after some Vancouver Island residents scrambled to build them a new home when their old tree was chopped down. Residents of Campbell River's Galerno Road were outraged and devastated in February when an eagle nest tree was cut down by a property owner.

http://soc.li/E4hR0eE
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: msdolittle on July 07, 2012, 16:25
Nice story, thanks for posting RCF.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on July 08, 2012, 06:54
(CNN) -- The resilience of a burned baby golden eagle that survived a Utah wildfire is astounding wildlife rehabilitators nursing him back to health.

"The trauma and the injury and the situation he is in -- to come out of it is amazing," said DaLyn Erickson, executive director of the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah in Ogden.  All of the eaglet's feathers, even on his head, were charred. He also suffered burns to the feet and around his beak.

His improbable story began June 1, when a volunteer who documents eagles placed a band on the bird. The Dump Fire erupted three weeks later, burning more than 5,500 acres south of Salt Lake City and west of Utah Lake.  Kent Keller returned in late June to the nest, built on the edge of the cliff, thinking he would recover the band from a deceased animal.  The nest on Lake Mountain was gone, the rocks behind it blackened by the blaze.  Keller then spotted legs and talons near a scorched juniper below.  Amazingly, the baby eagle was alive.

Near him were rabbit and squirrel carcasses, evidence his parents had tried to feed him after disaster struck. Fortunately, his eyes had not been burned.  Keller said he has thought of the horror the helpless nestling might have felt when flames approached.  

"He had enough courage to jump from that nest and try to save himself anyway," said Keller, 56, who describes himself as an amateur ornithologist. "He is a real fighter."  The fall was about 25 feet, and the eagle probably walked back to the base of the cliff after rolling another 100 feet, said Keller.  The bird remained in the area for several days while Keller, who is authorized to band raptors, sought permission from federal and state authorities to obtain care for him.

On Wednesday, Keller handed the bird over to Erickson.  She and her staff dubbed the survivor "Phoenix" -- a reference to the mythical creature that is reborn from the ashes.  There was no food in the craw of the dehydrated eagle, which weighed just over 5 pounds.

"He was lethargic and just obviously hurting," Erickson told CNN on Saturday. "After we got him hydrated and medications, he perked up and that fire came back in him."  Erickson said Phoenix, now about 70 days old, was a handful Saturday, lunging and using his talons as caregivers fed and provided antibiotics to the animal.

"He's not grateful," she quipped.  Rehabilitators limit their contact with the eagle so that he will not "habituate," or become too comfortable around people. They use hydrotherapy to help the healing in his feet.  "He needs those for hunting. There are lots of tendons and muscles we need to protect," said Erickson.

Golden eagles, which are protected, typically eat reptiles, birds and small mammals, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They also are known to scavenge carrion.  Keller said golden eagle females are slightly smaller than the more-famous bald eagle and tend to hunt more and scavenge less. Their particular favorite prey in northern Utah is the black-tailed jackrabbit.

The resident of suburban Salt Lake City studies golden eagles and provides population information to state wildlife authorities. Erickson called Keller "the hero in this story."

It's too early to tell whether Phoenix will be able to fly in the wild. Rehabilitation will take at least a year and his feathers won't fully moult until mid-2013.  "We are fairly confident, but there could be follicle damage we do not know about that would prevent feathers from coming in," Erickson said.

The nonprofit center, which treats about 1,800 animals a year, is accepting financial and food donations to offset the cost of caring for the golden eagle.  "He is doing well and we are very positive about his outcome right now," said Erickson. "(But) these types of things can turn at any moment."  In her 12 years of wildlife rehabilitation, Erickson said, the eagle's story is among a few cases she considers "nothing short of a miracle."
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on July 08, 2012, 07:24
Just adding to gemcitygemini's eaglet story

Lucky baby golden eagle survives wildfire after nest was burned to a crisp

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2170410/Lucky-baby-golden-eagle-survives-Utah-wildfire.html#ixzz2026Pp5qh
Photos and Video   http://www.emailthis.clickability.com/et/emailThis?clickMap=viewThis&etMailToID=950777890
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Jazzerkins on July 08, 2012, 10:40
What an amazing story.  Golden Eagles are very beautiful birds.  I hope he has the stamina to recover and that when he molts, the other feathers come in properly so he can once again fly free!  :)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on July 08, 2012, 12:46
..."In her 12 years of wildlife rehabilitation, Erickson said, the eagle's story is among a few cases she considers "nothing short of a miracle."

"Nothing short of a miracle" is nothing short of an understatement! :o Poor little guy, he must have suffered so much - been in so much pain. :'( How very fortunate for him to have been rescued by his bander. :) I hope he makes it. No wonder they named him Phoenix.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on January 01, 2013, 04:20

Two bald eagles save from frozen waters
The Globe & Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/life-video/video-vancouver-island-couple-rescues-two-bald-eagles-stuck-in-frozen-waters/article6805097/  

This was a close call.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Jazzerkins on January 01, 2013, 06:27
Wonderful story.  Thanks so much for posting the link.  :D
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on January 01, 2013, 12:29
Wonderful story.  Thanks so much for posting the link.  :D

You are so welcome, Jazzerkins. We saw this clip on tv yesterday and I was hoping to find a link online to share. A very close call for the eagles. Thankfully the couple spotted them.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on January 01, 2013, 14:02
Lovely New Year's story.  :)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on March 25, 2013, 08:14
Duke Farms Eagle Camera

Update 3/24/2013
It appears a hawk (likely a red-tailed hawk) attempted to attack the nest and got killed by the parents. It is currently unknown if the eggs/hatchings where harmed in the attack.


Red Tailed Hawk tries to attack nest, gets killed by parent.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/30332727/highlight/334419
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: susha on March 25, 2013, 10:16
Why on earth would a RT hawk attack the nest with the parent there?!? ::)  Must've had a death wish :P

I hope the eggs/hatchlings are okay.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on March 25, 2013, 11:55

 :) Update 3/25/2013
It appears at least one chick has hatched, biologists have observed feeding in the nest (with the adult feeding the chick the remains of the hawk from the attack on 3/24/2013).
:)

I started a thread for these eagles, here is the link.

http://www.species-at-risk.mb.ca/projects/pfrp/forum/programs/index.php/topic,3389.msg90698.html#msg90698
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Doreen on December 06, 2013, 10:43
Very Sad.  :'(

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/business/govt-extends-permit-time-allowing-wind-farms-to-kill-harm-eagles-by-25-years-234743811.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/business/govt-extends-permit-time-allowing-wind-farms-to-kill-harm-eagles-by-25-years-234743811.html)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on December 06, 2013, 11:22
Very Sad.  :'(

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/business/govt-extends-permit-time-allowing-wind-farms-to-kill-harm-eagles-by-25-years-234743811.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/business/govt-extends-permit-time-allowing-wind-farms-to-kill-harm-eagles-by-25-years-234743811.html)

Altamont is the NA first wind farm - even possibly before they understood how much of a problem they would/could be to birds, particularly raptors.  Now most (note I say most, not all) farms are not built on/along ridges because those are the ones that are the most deadly for raptors who run ridges while migrating.  Raptors, like other top predator species, reproduce in small numbers and have a high rate of mortality when young so additional threats are of concern.  Altamont is huge and built all over ridges in California and it has high (relative to new wind farms) raptor mortality rates because of this siting.  In fact, it is the only site that I have seen burrowing owls as one of the species affected.  Not so much how many owls but rather given how few owls there are, that they are the list at all is surprising.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Feather2Fin on December 08, 2013, 18:11
I was really surprised this afternoon to see a bald eagle flying towards the Assinboine river.  I spotted it just as we were turning on to Nassau st. N.  Unmistakable with the white head, huge wing span and yellow feet.  Wow!
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Jazzerkins on December 15, 2013, 16:42
So sad.  :'(  http://www.thv11.com/news/article/291065/2/4-bald-eagles-die-in-Utah-from-similar-symptoms
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on December 15, 2013, 17:14
So sad.  :'(  http://www.thv11.com/news/article/291065/2/4-bald-eagles-die-in-Utah-from-similar-symptoms

I think carbamate (carbofuran/furadan) poisoning includes tremors and/or seizures, not sure about the paralysis though ... furadan is still a legal pesticide in the US I believe ... will be interesting to hear what the necropsy uncovers ...
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on December 30, 2013, 13:31
A sad story to end out the year ....

Bald eagle deaths a mystery
Something is killing bald eagles in northern and central Utah, and state wildlife officials are baffled.


by: John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times / Reprinted in the Winnipeg Free Press - 12/30/2013

SALT LAKE CITY -- Bald eagles are dying in Utah -- 20 in the past few weeks alone -- and nobody can figure out why.

Hundreds of the majestic birds -- many with wing spans of two metres or more -- migrate here each winter, gathering along the Great Salt Lake and feasting on carp and other fish that swim in the nearby freshwater bays.

Earlier this month, however, hunters and farmers across five counties in northern and central Utah began finding the normally skittish raptors lying listless on the ground. Many suffered from seizures, head tremors and paralysis in the legs, feet and wings.

Many of the eagles were brought to the mammoth Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah, where Buz Marthaler -- a longtime animal caretaker -- and other handlers tried to save the birds. Within 48 hours most were dead.



Read the rest of the story here:  http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/world/bald-eagle-deaths-a-mystery-237928261.html
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Jazzerkins on December 30, 2013, 18:39
How sad.  :'(  I hope the authorities can determine what is killing these majestic birds.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: birdcamfan on December 30, 2013, 18:53
I read about this in the paper today. So sad to hear.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: RCF on December 31, 2013, 18:05
Dead Utah eagles killed by West Nile virus

State wildlife officials announced Tuesday that the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis., confirmed West Nile virus is the cause of the eagle deaths. Five more eagles are currently being treated in wildlife rehabilitation centers.

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/57336899-78/virus-nile-west-wildlife.html.csp (http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/57336899-78/virus-nile-west-wildlife.html.csp)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on December 31, 2013, 18:17
State wildlife officials announced Tuesday that the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis., confirmed West Nile virus is the cause of the eagle deaths. Five more eagles are currently being treated in wildlife rehabilitation centers.

Sad to lose so many but better to lose to a "natural" cause than say poisoning or other human impact ... West Nile may not have been endemic to North America until recently (1990s) but it is serious given the number of possible end results = WNV fever, meningitis, encephalitis, meningo-encephalitis, and it may or may not be present in poliomyelytis-like syndrome ...

For those wanting more information:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Nile_virus

Thanks for keeping an eye on this story RCF
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Elaine L on December 31, 2013, 22:57
I am so sorry to read all the sad news about eagles.  I can't believe that people still use poison - it is like something out of the dark ages.  

I moved here to Parksville on Vancouver Island from Edmonton, Alberta, six months ago, and was delighted to observe six bald eagles while walking along the ocean path at Rathtrevor Beach.  They were just riding the wind, much like falcons do.  I could not see where the nest was, and I could not tell a parent from chicks, or whether they were even all related.  I hate to be so uninformed about eagles, but now is as good a time as any to learn.  I left our falcon watch behind in Edmonton, so I hope to find that there is some kind of eagle watch here, and the local nature group I have joined should be able to tell me more.  

Perhaps others on this Forum have already reported on the eagles in Parksville, and I have just not seen it.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on January 03, 2014, 14:09
2 Bald Eagles Found Shot To Death In Montgomery County (MD, USA)
CBS Baltimore

BROOKVILLE, Md. (WJZ) — It’s the proud national bird symbol of the United States, yet someone in Maryland is shooting them.

Jessica Kartalija explains not only is killing the bald eagle disturbing, it’s illegal.  The birds are federally protected, but that didn’t stop two people from shooting at them.

Bald eagles can be found year-round throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Now, after finding two with gunshot wounds, Natural Resources Police are searching for whoever pulled the trigger.

“A person out on Christmas Day heard a shot and saw an eagle laying dead in the field,” said Candy Thomson, Maryland Department of Natural Resources Police.

X-rays determined the eagle was shot with a rifle near Brookeville. Because the bird wasn’t mature, there’s a chance the shooter mistook it for a vulture or osprey. However, another was found dead three days later in Darnestown.

“The second one was a mature bird, so it had the full plumage that people know as the American symbol,” Thomson said.

That means, if convicted, the shooter could be required to pay a $5,000 fine and spend a year behind bars.  The Chesapeake region is an important stop for bald eagles migrating to other parts of the country.  With some 5,000 pairs of bald eagle in the state, they aren’t considered threatened or endangered in Maryland. Still, shooting them is illegal.

“The birds are still protected under the American Bald Eagle and Golden Eagle Protection Act,” said Thomson.

Investigators don’t believe the two incidents are related. They took place on opposite sides of Montgomery County.  Police tell WJZ they have received several tips and are now investigating several leads.  Maryland Department of Natural Resources Police ask anyone with information to contact the 24-hour “Catch a Poacher” hotline at 1-800-635-6124.


There is a video of a bald eagle:  http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2014/01/02/2-bald-eagles-found-shot-to-death-in-montgomery-county/
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on January 03, 2014, 17:35
Dead Utah eagles killed by West Nile virus

State wildlife officials announced Tuesday that the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis., confirmed West Nile virus is the cause of the eagle deaths. Five more eagles are currently being treated in wildlife rehabilitation centers.

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/57336899-78/virus-nile-west-wildlife.html.csp (http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/57336899-78/virus-nile-west-wildlife.html.csp)

There is some interesting chatter going on about the diagnosis of WNV for the eagle deaths.  People who know way more about avian diseases say that they are surprised at the WNV diagnosis when it would seem more likely to be botulism or avian cholera.  USFWS is saying that the eagles died/became ill as a result of eating dead/dying eared grebes that died from WNV.  Others are saying that the death of 20,000 (yes that is the right number of zeroes) eared grebes since November is too many for WNV at this time of the year even if there was a huge number of WNV infected mosquitoes (they are what would have infected the grebes) at a time of the year when mosquitoes are not in the ascendant.  Hence the question that has arisen, do the eagles have WNV in their system but did they die of something else such as avian botulism or avian cholera both of which are known to kill huge numbers of birds in localized areas.  (Whitewater Lake in Manitoba is known to have huge avian botulism problems when water levels are low and summer temps are higher).

Don't know if the diagnosis will change, but it's interesting to see that there still is a question in these eagles deaths ...
The other thing that is interesting is that 27 eagles make every newspaper in the USA, 20,000 dead eared grebes didn't ...
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on January 08, 2014, 09:17
Interior Department Releases Revised Rule to Ensure Long-term Monitoring and Protection of Eagles While Facilitating Renewable Energy Development
press release / USFWS / 6 Dec 2013
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Department of the Interior today announced changes to regulations enabling the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to better monitor and address the long-term impacts of renewable energy projects and other activities on federally-protected eagles. In addition to these immediate changes, the Service will continue its comprehensive review of all eagle permitting regulations to determine if other modifications are necessary to increase their efficiency and effectiveness.
 
“Renewable energy development is vitally important to our nation’s future, but it has to be done in the right way,” said Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. “The changes in this permitting program will help the renewable energy industry and others develop projects that can operate in the longer term, while ensuring bald and golden eagles continue to thrive for future generations.”
 
In 2009, the Service began a permitting program under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act applicable to developers of renewable energy projects and other activities that may “take” (injure, kill or otherwise disturb) bald and golden eagles. The Eagle Act allows the Service to authorize the programmatic take of eagles, which is take associated with, but not the purpose of, an otherwise lawful activity and does not have a long-term impact on the population.
 
These permits have been for a maximum of five years – a period that does not reflect the actual operating parameters of most renewable energy projects or other similar long term project operations. The revised rule, a result of extensive stakeholder engagement and public comment, extends the maximum permit tenure to 30 years, subject to a recurring five-year review process throughout the permit life. 


Read the full release here:
http://www.fws.gov/news/ShowNews.cfm?ID=C89793DD-9A58-2AC0-D6AB01D20FA91C99


Interior Dept. Rule Greenlights Eagle Slaughter at Wind Farms, Says Audubon CEO
press release / Audubon / 5 Dec 2013

New Rule Will Authorize 30-Year Permits for Killing America's National Bird

In a stunningly bad move for eagles, the U.S. Department of the Interior has finalized a new rule that would make it possible to grant wind energy companies 30-year permits to kill Bald and Golden eagles. Audubon's CEO released the following statement:

“Instead of balancing the need for conservation and renewable energy, Interior wrote the wind industry a blank check,” said Audubon President and CEO David Yarnold. “It’s outrageous that the government is sanctioning the killing of America’s symbol, the Bald Eagle. Audubon will continue to look for reasonable, thoughtful partners to wean America off fossil fuels because that should be everyone’s highest priority. We have no choice but to challenge this decision, and all options are on the table.”


source:
http://www.audubon.org/newsroom/press-releases/2013/interior-dept-rule-greenlights-eagle-slaughter-wind-farms-says-audubon-
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on September 23, 2014, 05:41
The eagle has landed: Fisherman saves drowning baby eagle
CTV News


link to video:  http://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/video?playlistId=1.2019588

Amazing!
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: susha on September 25, 2014, 18:09
Oh - I hope he/she makes it!  Thanks gcg!
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Doreen on December 04, 2014, 19:07
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/photo-contest/2012/entries/159313/view/
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: MayShowers on December 05, 2014, 05:47
The eagle has landed: Fisherman saves drowning baby eagle
CTV News


link to video:  http://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/video?playlistId=1.2019588

Amazing!

I found this update on the O.W.L Facebook page:

"O.W.L. Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society
November 25
A little update on the Bald eagle from Nanoose Bay. She is doing well off of the medication, and was moved to a slightly larger cage with two eagle cage mates to help show her some skills while continuing to recover. Thanks again to Huff Animal Hospital for their assistance, and Don for the rescue."
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on December 05, 2014, 14:43
Thanks for sharing this, MayShowers!  :)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on June 13, 2015, 17:31
Record-setting bald eagle, 38, killed in N.Y.
Winnipeg Free Press / 13 June 2015

MELVILLE, N.Y. -- A banded, bald eagle found dead Tuesday on an upstate New York roadway turned out to be 38 years old, the oldest one recovered so far in a U.S. effort to bring the species back from the brink of extinction, New York state and federal environmental agencies said.



Source: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/world/record-setting-bald-eagle-38-killed-in-ny-307247401.html
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on June 14, 2015, 04:58
This is so very sad. Thanks for sharing, TPC! I wonder how many more years he would have survived. Why oh why didn't the driver stop and then report it. Clearly, it was a tragic accident, not intentional. He wouldn't have been charged. However. hit and run, another story. Would have major damage and trace evidence to his/her vehicle.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on June 18, 2015, 04:46
I just watched this video and was saddened by this event. It is indeed sad that Alaska doesn't carry the same penalties as the lower 48 states.  :'(

http://www.msn.com/en-ca/video/news/man-arrested-in-alaska-for-running-over-bald-eagles-with-his-truck/vi-BBleOcc?ocid=ASUDHP
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: dupre501 on August 02, 2015, 12:20
http://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/this-eagle-tried-to-ace-a-landing-it-failed-hilariously/54919/?intcmp=twn_promo_news3 (http://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/this-eagle-tried-to-ace-a-landing-it-failed-hilariously/54919/?intcmp=twn_promo_news3)

Golden eagle just misses landing in it's nest. Oops....

Kind of funny actually.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on August 04, 2015, 04:09
The video has been removed. Too bad, I would have liked to see it.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on August 04, 2015, 12:36
The video has been removed. Too bad, I would have liked to see it.

The video in the text has been removed but the video is still available above the article, you just have to watch the ad first.  Or at least it was when I checked out at 1230h today.  ???
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on August 04, 2015, 23:32
Yup, as TPC says, the video is still available, after the advertisement, gemcity. :)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on August 05, 2015, 04:46
Thanks, TPC! I will do that!

The video is up and running again. Awww! Can an eagle feel embarrassment?
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on August 13, 2015, 11:34
Eagle takes down a drone in this video.

http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/news/national/watch-fierce-eagle-takes-down-drone-midair/nnJY8/?ecmp=daytondaily_social_facebook_2014_sfp
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: dupre501 on August 18, 2015, 12:29
Wow!
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on August 19, 2015, 05:45
This is SO disturbing!  :'(

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/endangered-philippine-eagle-found-shot-to-death-in-philippines/
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Kinderchick on August 19, 2015, 23:20
You are right, gemcity. Very disturbing to have this rare eagle species shot dead after being nursed back to health & released back into the wild. Even more disturbing is that there are only about 400 nesting adult pairs left in the Phillipines. :(
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on August 21, 2015, 08:26
About once a week, I receive a newsletter from Eastwood Eagle Watchers. Eagle Jim is the photographer and he is the author of these newsletters. His photos of the eagles are breathtaking. His writings are eloquent. I wanted to share with you the newsletter I received today. In it he talks of insomnia and how a poem repeated itself in his mind. Finally, at 2:00 A.M., he got up and wrote it down and The following is his poem. Enjoy!  :)

https://eastwoodeaglewatchers.wordpress.com/2015/08/18/eagles-of-inspiration/#comments 
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Jazzerkins on August 21, 2015, 12:56
A beautiful poem.  Thanks for sharing gcg.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on August 21, 2015, 15:12
The video has been removed. Too bad, I would have liked to see it.

The video in the text has been removed but the video is still available above the article, you just have to watch the ad first.  Or at least it was when I checked out at 1230h today.  ???

I tried to look at the video, but there is only a message saying "This video does not exist."

The cameras at the nest are owned by a site in Latvia. Whoever posted this video elsewhere removed the identifying line of information on the video which gave the source; they then replaced it with their own information, as if it were their video.

This is a breach of copyright, and the people at the originating site were extremely displeased. They were also greatly offended by the nasty comments which were posted about the eagle. I understand the video has now been made private.

The eagle involved is a Sea Eagle, and he is a young eaglet just learning to fly. I have now seen photos of him, and he is beautiful.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on February 02, 2016, 09:18
Dutch police train eagles to snatch enemy drones
Toby Sterling / Reuters / 2 Feb 2016

(http://static.theglobeandmail.ca/7b2/news/world/article28506177.ece/ALTERNATES/w620/YH02_DUTCH_POLICE_DRONES.JPG)

Dutch police puzzling over how to remove drones that pose a public safety threat are testing a way to get the job done in one fell swoop - with trained eagles.

“It’s a low-tech solution to a high-tech problem,” spokesman Dennis Janus of the country’s national police said.

The idea arose because amateur use of drones has boomed and police have begun to worry about unlicensed drones flying into off-limit spaces around airports or above public events such as politician’s appearances.  Possible solutions the Dutch police have studied include shooting nets at the offending drones, remotely hacking them to seize their controls - or taking them out with birds of prey.

“People sometimes think it’s a hoax, but it’s proving very effective so far,” Janus said.

Showing off the technique in a video released by police, a four-propeller drone hovers in the middle of a warehouse, coloured lights flashing.  Released by her keeper, a white-tailed eagle glides straight toward the drone, clutches it easily in her talons - clack! - and drags it to the ground.  Sjoerd Hoogendoorn of “Guard from Above,” the company working with police to develop the concept, said the birds must be trained to recognize the drones as prey.  They are rewarded with a piece of meat after each successful foray.  Their scaly talons are strong and tough enough to seize most consumer-grade drones without injury from the blades, he said.

“These birds are used to meeting resistance from animals they hunt in the wild, and they don’t seem to have much trouble with the drones,” he said.  The potential impact on the animals’ welfare is subject of testing by an external scientific research institute.

“The real problem we have is that they destroy a lot of drones,” Hoogendoorn said. “It’s a major cost of testing.”  Another unknown is how the the birds will fare in a crowd situation, he said. 

A decision by police on whether to move ahead with using the eagles is expected by the end of the year.


Source: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/dutch-police-train-eagles-to-snatch-enemy-drones/article28506178/

Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on February 23, 2016, 10:25
This is so tragic. I will continue to watch for updates.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/13-bald-eagles-found-dead-on-maryland-farm/ ::) ::)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on May 04, 2016, 18:39
Collision with bald eagle caused plane to crash outside Alaska, killing 4 people on board
National Post / Mark Thiessen (AP) / 4 May 2016

(http://wpmedia.news.nationalpost.com/2016/05/aptopix_anchorage_plane_crash.jpg?quality=65&strip=all&w=620)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A small airplane hit a bald eagle before it crashed just north of Anchorage, Alaska, last month, killing all four people on board.

An investigator says it’s the nation’s first civilian plane crash to result in deaths after an impact with a bald eagle.

Shaun Williams with the National Transportation Safety Board says there have been other crashes involving eagle strikes that resulted in serious injuries, not deaths.

The pilot, co-pilot and two passengers died when the plane went down April 20 near a small airport about 20 miles north of Anchorage.

Williams says an unknown substance was later found on the aircraft. Analysis at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., determined some of it was feathers and other materials that came from an immature bald eagle.


source: National Post -  Collision with bald eagle caused plane to crash outside Alaska killing 4 people on board  (http://news.nationalpost.com/news/world/collision-with-bald-eagle-caused-plane-to-crash-outside-alaska-killing-4-people-on-board)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on May 28, 2016, 06:20
I just read this on the CBC site and had to share. This is happening all to frequently.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/bald-eagle-rescued-from-fishing-line-in-manitoba-1.3604691
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on September 09, 2016, 23:14
This bald eagle was rescued by wildlife officials after being injured by Hurricane Hermine in Florida. I am glad she was found, and wonder how many other injured birds may be out there.

https://www.facebook.com/USofAwesome/videos/vb.552387251590100/614838942011597/?type=3&theater (https://www.facebook.com/USofAwesome/videos/vb.552387251590100/614838942011597/?type=3&theater)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on September 10, 2016, 04:59
 :'(  Although it is so painful to watch this video, sometimes we forget how the force of nature effects our wildlife. So happy to hear they expect a full recovery. Thanks for sharing, Alison.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: burdi on September 12, 2016, 17:43
This bald eagle was rescued by wildlife officials after being injured by Hurricane Hermine in Florida. I am glad she was found, and wonder how many other injured birds may be out there.

https://www.facebook.com/USofAwesome/videos/vb.552387251590100/614838942011597/?type=3&theater (https://www.facebook.com/USofAwesome/videos/vb.552387251590100/614838942011597/?type=3&theater)


This poor bald eagle is so lucky to be having her injuries treated by very caring people; unfortunately, there are probably numerous birds and other wildlife who were not rescued. Thank you for posting this news, Alison.

It is very emotional to see an innocent eagle in such pain. :'(  I’ve been wondering how this eagle is doing and found a brief update which sounds hopeful, though there is still concern for her eyes. 

The following update was posted on September 10 from Wildlife,Inc. Education & Rehabilitation Center, by Devon:

Her eyes have opened up more and her head looks a lot better. She has a lot more strength than when she came in and its almost to strong to hold onto her while she's being treated. Mainly its her eyes we're concerned about.

-Devon


Website -- http://wildlifeinc.org/ (http://wildlifeinc.org/)

Facebook -- https://www.facebook.com/WildlifeInc/posts/1248662305175553 (https://www.facebook.com/WildlifeInc/posts/1248662305175553)

Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on September 15, 2016, 21:53

This poor bald eagle is so lucky to be having her injuries treated by very caring people; unfortunately, there are probably numerous birds and other wildlife who were not rescued. Thank you for posting this news, Alison.

It is very emotional to see an innocent eagle in such pain. :'(  I’ve been wondering how this eagle is doing and found a brief update which sounds hopeful, though there is still concern for her eyes. 

The following update was posted on September 10 from Wildlife,Inc. Education & Rehabilitation Center, by Devon:

Her eyes have opened up more and her head looks a lot better. She has a lot more strength than when she came in and its almost to strong to hold onto her while she's being treated. Mainly its her eyes we're concerned about.

-Devon


Thank you for the update on the Bradenton eagle, burdi!

Here is some more background information about her rescue:

September 6, 2016

I'd like to thank Manatee County Park Rangers Clayton McCurry, Logan Arbuckle and Johnny Mcleod for calling us to rescue this injured eagle and standing guard until I could arrive today. The eagle has multiple injuries including head,eyes and a wing. It appears she has been injured and on the ground for close to a week, wounds are necrotic. The great Doctors and staff at Palma Sola Veterinarian Clinic examined and treated the eagle, we will continue to care for the bird at our hospital. She is in bad shape but we will do everything we can. We believe she was injured during hurricane hermine. Thanks again to the Manatee County Park Rangers! -Damen


Photo: Wildlife, Inc.

(http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa393/falcoperegrinus1/July%202016/bradenton-eagle-sept-6-1a_zpsna4zhdww.jpg) (http://s1195.photobucket.com/user/falcoperegrinus1/media/July%202016/bradenton-eagle-sept-6-1a_zpsna4zhdww.jpg.html)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on September 15, 2016, 21:57
The following day:

September 7, 2016

Believe it or not, this is after a thorough cleaning and flushing. We believe this eagle is a victim of Hurricane Hermine, the wounds are close to a week old, she most likely crashed due to high winds and was possibly shocked by a powerline in the process. She is alert and eating, which is amazing considering her condition. She has a wound on top of her head that is infected, she has a scratch on his cornea in the right eye but the left is clear and she has a wound on the right wrist which is minor. Most of what you see is dried blood, we will slowly remove it over the next few days, we cannot stress her too much at the moment. She is on pain medication and antibiotics to help her fight infection. We do believe she is going to recover, not out of the woods yet, but I believe she will recover 100%. Wish her luck. -Damen


Photo: Wildlife, Inc.

(http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa393/falcoperegrinus1/July%202016/bradenton-eagle-sept-7-1a_zpszinhpnqy.jpg) (http://s1195.photobucket.com/user/falcoperegrinus1/media/July%202016/bradenton-eagle-sept-7-1a_zpszinhpnqy.jpg.html)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on September 15, 2016, 22:10
Today's update:

We transferred the Eagle to another facility for long term care and flight training, she will be returned to Bradenton for release when she is ready. I would like to show you a photo comparison of her wounds on day one vs today before she left. It's been about a week and a half since we rescued her. Take a look at the photos and you will see the difference is pretty dramatic, we had to clean the wounds several times daily and give her antibiotics twice daily among many other medications and treatments. Wish her luck and a quick recovery.

Photos: Wildlife, Inc.

(http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa393/falcoperegrinus1/July%202016/bradenton-eagle-sept-15-1a_zpsqvfpprwp.jpg) (http://s1195.photobucket.com/user/falcoperegrinus1/media/July%202016/bradenton-eagle-sept-15-1a_zpsqvfpprwp.jpg.html)  (http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa393/falcoperegrinus1/July%202016/bradenton-eagle-sept-15-2a_zpswdwn1cvb.jpg) (http://s1195.photobucket.com/user/falcoperegrinus1/media/July%202016/bradenton-eagle-sept-15-2a_zpswdwn1cvb.jpg.html)

That was a very nasty head injury. With all her injuries, she has been through so much, and it is good to see her improving.

I hope the other facility will give her the same excellent level of care as Wildlife, Inc. has been providing for her. I had never heard of Wildlife, Inc. before I came across the first video of the eagle, but they seem very dedicated and they have carried out some very fine rescues recently.

I hope they will continue to post updates, and that the eagle will make a full recovery and, in time, be able to be released back in Bradenton.

https://www.facebook.com/WildlifeInc/ (https://www.facebook.com/WildlifeInc/)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on October 18, 2016, 16:03
An update from September 20 on the Bradenton eagle, who was transferred to the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey for continued care.

(http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa393/falcoperegrinus1/October%202016/bradenton-eagle-1a_zpspr21ljjr.jpg) (http://s1195.photobucket.com/user/falcoperegrinus1/media/October%202016/bradenton-eagle-1a_zpspr21ljjr.jpg.html)

Our first Bald Eagle patient of the season! This Bald Eagle was brought to us from Wildlife,Inc. Education & Rehabilitation Center in Bradenton. We believe it sustained injuries during a territory fight. It is currently recovering in the clinic and will soon be sent to our rehabilitation area.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on October 18, 2016, 16:07
October 18, 2016

And an update on the Bradenton eagle from Wildlife, Inc., posted four hours ago:

UPDATE: The eagle we rescued in early September is doing much better. It is believed to be a large male and not female. It is also believed that his wounds were likely due to a territorial dispute, it was hard to tell when he first came in, after some of the scabs and dry blood was removed , we noticed talon puncture wounds , which were later confirmed by Audubon Center for Birds of Prey where the eagle is currently being rehabilitated. They expect a full recovery and release back to the wild. We will keep you posted. -Damen

https://www.facebook.com/WildlifeInc/photos/a.119657901409338.7572.119140391461089/1290602647648185/?type=3&theater (https://www.facebook.com/WildlifeInc/photos/a.119657901409338.7572.119140391461089/1290602647648185/?type=3&theater)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Alison on December 02, 2016, 09:38
The Bradenton eagle has recovered and has been released!

The eagle had been rescued and cared for by Wildlife Inc. Later, he was transferred to the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey for additional care. He was returned to Bradenton to be released in his home area.

From Wildlife Inc.:

I contacted the Weather Channel the other day and gave them an update on our eagle. They were more than happy to share his release video. He was under the care of the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey, then brought back by Eagle Watch volunteers where he was released by Damen on Sunday at Lake Manatee State Park. Huge thanks to all involved!

-Devon


(https://picload.org/image/radaaadc/bradenton-eagle-released-dec-2.jpg)

It is so good to see him flying free again. He looks great.

There is a short video of the release:

https://www.facebook.com/WildlifeInc/posts/1340841145957668 (https://www.facebook.com/WildlifeInc/posts/1340841145957668)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on January 31, 2017, 22:30
Like being on safari
http://bc.ctvnews.ca/mobile/like-being-on-safari-hundreds-of-bald-eagles-flock-to-delta-fields-1.3265751

Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: bcbird on February 04, 2017, 13:32
We had a few trips in this area in January and were certainly noticing all the bald eagles. 
Eagles in trees, eagles on fence posts and eagles on the ground in the fields. 
Wonderful indeed to see so many at once.!
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on February 08, 2017, 05:29
This is heartbreaking. I am following several eagle cams, including in Pennsylvania.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/bald-eagle-pennsylvania-leg-trap-clamped-to-foot/
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Dagny on February 09, 2017, 19:29
The eagle has been freed from the trap and appears to be in good condition  ;D

http://abc27.com/2017/02/09/bald-eagle-appears-free-of-trap-on-foot/
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on February 10, 2017, 04:56
This is incredible news. Thanks for sharing, Dagny.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Jazzerkins on March 09, 2017, 19:41
This is horrible.  Something MUST be done.

https://www.thedodo.com/bald-eagle-ammunition-refuges-2306402071.html
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on March 11, 2017, 23:54
This is horrible.  Something MUST be done.

https://www.thedodo.com/bald-eagle-ammunition-refuges-2306402071.html


For those interested in doing something, here's some background information courtesy of the good folks at the USGS - Disease Information - Lead Poisoning (https://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_information/lead_poisoning/)

Note, non-toxic shot (i.e., lead shot) has been banned in Canada and the USA for 25 years (I think I got the date right at least) ...
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: pmg on June 08, 2017, 15:40
Bald eagle chooses to adopt -- not eat -- baby hawk
http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/bald-eagle-chooses-to-adopt-not-eat-baby-hawk-1.3449080
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on June 08, 2017, 18:28
Bald eagle chooses to adopt -- not eat -- baby hawk
http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/bald-eagle-chooses-to-adopt-not-eat-baby-hawk-1.3449080

I wish the little tot luck - having said that, these parents have managed to get 3 eaglets to this stage, so it doesn't seem like food is a problem so the eaglets may not look at their smaller nestmate as a snack!
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on July 30, 2017, 00:17
Update from 26 July 2017 - be sure to visit the link at the bottom to see the videos

'This guy thinks he is a bald eagle': Young hawk defies odds in Sidney, B.C.
by Megan Thomas / CBC News / 26 July 2017

(https://i.cbc.ca/1.4222428.1501085622!/fileImage/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/16x9_620/red-tailed-hawk.jpg)

A young red-tailed hawk that has been raised by a pair of bald eagles in a Sidney, B.C., nest continues to defy the odds. The young hawk ended up in the bald eagle's nest in Roberts Bay in early June — likely intended as the next meal for their eaglets. Instead, he survived and became part of the eagle family.

"This guy thinks he is a bald eagle and I think that is what helped him survive," said David Bird, an emeritus professor of wildlife biology at McGill University who now lives in Sidney. The hawk likely started begging for food after he arrived in the nest, and the eagle parents started to treat him like the other eaglets, Bird said. "The last time I laid eyes on him just a few days ago, he's in excellent health," he said.

The young hawk some have nicknamed Spunky has captured the imagination of bird-watchers in Sidney since he was first spotted living with the eagles. But most wildlife experts did not think he would make it in a nest full of his natural predators.

"Initially I thought he can't survive in this nest. One of his siblings would just simply put a foot on him and that would be the end of him," said David Hancock, a wildlife biologist who specializes in bald eagles. But he kept eating and growing and pretty soon he grew full size. So he's a mini little eaglet."

The young hawk has to learn to fly and has been spotted splashing around in bird baths in Sidney. But Bird says his next big challenge is to figure out how to gather his own food, like a hawk rather than an eagle. Hawks tend to rely on hunting species such as voles and meadow mice, while eagles often hunt for fish.  "If he does get so weak because he is not finding food ... then I think it is a no brainer to catch him and take him to a wildlife rehab facility," he said.

There's also concern that the young hawk will not be sufficiently wary of other eagles, given his unusual upbringing, Hancock said.

But for now, Spunky is holding his own.

A plan is also being hatched to turn his story into a documentary film, Bird said.



source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/hawk-survives-with-eagles-1.4221651
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: pmg on August 01, 2017, 10:41
thank you for posting this follow-up story TPC  :)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: burdi on December 11, 2017, 15:35
Poisoned Bald Eagle Highlights Lead Bullet Controversy (https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/12/eagle-death-lead-poisoning-ammunition-bullets-spd/?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_tw20171209news-poisoneagle&utm_campaign=Content&sf175781504=1)

Bald eagles are scavengers and commonly feed on the poisoned remains of animals shot with lead bullets.

By Sarah Gibbens
PUBLISHED December 8, 2017

Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: bcbird on April 26, 2019, 15:31
BC Hydro crews called to ‘renovate’ eagle’s nest near Chase, B.C.

https://globalnews.ca/news/5202869/bc-hydro-chase-eagle-nest/ (https://globalnews.ca/news/5202869/bc-hydro-chase-eagle-nest/)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: dupre501 on May 24, 2019, 13:46
Cool photo of bald eagle

https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/ontario-windsor-photographers-shot-of-bald-eagle-goes-viral-water-reflection (https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/ontario-windsor-photographers-shot-of-bald-eagle-goes-viral-water-reflection)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: Jazzerkins on May 25, 2019, 07:43
Great photos! 8)
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: The Peregrine Chick on November 05, 2019, 23:38
Authorities seek tips on shooting, killing of bald eagles in Alberta
The Canadian Press / Winnipeg Free Press / 4 Nov 2019

(https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/CPT10927710.jpg)
A bald eagle hangs fliies over a field in Sheffield Mills, N.S., a popular tourist destination, on Friday, Jan. 12, 2018. Alberta Fish and Wildlife is investigating the shooting of two bald eagles in separate areas of the province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Alberta Fish and Wildlife is investigating the shooting of two bald eagles in separate areas of the province.  The  provincial agency says a juvenile eagle was killed in the Fort McMurray area sometime between Oct. 26 and Oct. 29, then left to waste.  The second raptor involved a mature eagle found dead Oct. 20 and possibly killed the same day in a pheasant release site in the Wetaskiwin region.  The agency says there is no indication the killings are connected and it's looking for tips from the public to help find whoever was responsible.

The bald eagle is a protected species in Alberta and there is no hunting season for it.  The maximum penalty for killing one of the birds is a $100,000 fine or possibly two years in jail.
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: irenekl on November 09, 2019, 01:38
Can hardly believe I’m reading this.  I just don’t get what happens in a person to do this kind of thing. 
I’m stunned actually.  So unhappy, so disturbed.   
Title: Re: News: Eagles
Post by: GCG on November 09, 2019, 03:59
 :o >:( This is disturbing news. I am shocked every time I read about the callous act of someone who takes pleasure in downing the beauty and grace of a bald eagle. I often watch North Woods Law on Animal Planet. They have often taken evidence from an animal/bird and through forensics, have traced and tracked the shooter. I can only hope they find, fine and convict the shooter(s).