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I am wondering if the chicks at this nest were named? And also whether there are any updates or sightings of them.

The chicks were named as part of a mash-up of name themes we had this year.  Started out the year with 4 peregrines in rehab that might potentially be releaseable this spring so I thought we'd name them after comets/meteors/meteor showers.  In the end, only 2 survived to be releaseable - the first was Lyra who was released during the, wait for it, Lyrid meteor shower.  Second bird decided he didn't want bands or a name and bolted when he was been caught for transport for his release.  Got to give he credit for knowing he was ready to go and wanting to go but it would have been nice to have a band on him.  Oh well, at least he's off and flying.  So names for the Logan chicks - Potter was the name that just appeared for our hand raised chick (the chick who lived and all that) but only if he was a male, which he was.  So what about his brother and sister?  Here's where the mashup came in.  For the boy - Sirius - both a astronomical entity (star) and a Potterverse entity (name of one of Harry Potter's kids).  For the girl - Luna - astronomical (the Moon) and Potterverse (Harry's daughter).  The astronomical associations were ones I already knew but not being so well-versed in the Potterverse I had to do a little research and it just so happened that all the, forgive me, stars aligned on those names.

Last sighting was of Potter and Luna hanging out together near the nestsite and seemingly doing very well.  Interestingly these two fledged at about the same time and found themselves in less than perfect early landing locations but they both managed to get themselves sorted and out of there.  Luna did better, Potter was rescued and returned to the roof and no problems after that.  Sirius was fine after he fledged right up until he collided with a building.  Looked like neurological damage but that seems to have been resolving itself when he died in care.  It might have been he wouldn't have fully recovered but he had been doing better.  Shock is a weird thing, some birds tolerate it better than others.  For Sirius it might have been a blessing - if his condition hadn't resolved itself more - this quality of life would have been so impaired that euthanasia would have been the only humane option.

Hadn't seen either of the adults for at least a couple of months until this week when I'm pretty sure it was Hart in the Radisson nestbox looking way to comfortable for Pip (pretty sure it was Pip) to tolerate.  Can't say that the boys were fighting off camera, there was just a couple of visits on a single day, and Hart has been last to leave for a number of years and it isn't unusual to see him at the Radisson before he goes.  I don't think he was expecting Pip to still be around though.  Interesting to see the kid chasing his dad out of the former's nestbox where the latter hatched years before.   ;D
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Are there any updates available for this site? Any more sightings of Fidler (love the name)?

Last observation I have confirmed for Fidler is that he was spotted along the river near Assinibine Park - an eagle eyed birder with a pair of binocs was able to read his band number.  I hope he does well, he had a damp start to life and it would be nice to see him survive!
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Fargo is a bit of a sticky wicket at the moment.  The Audubon folks are the ones overseeing the location and they have been totally uncommunicative (with anyone) and keep threatening to take their toys and go home.    A peregrine friend of mine did take a run through Fargo a couple of times and saw who he believes is Annie (Annie only has one leg band now - two legs but only one band) and a female he couldn't identify.  Not even sure the female had bands but will have to check on that - and check and see if he went by after I spoke with him a few months ago.  There was no nesting behaviour however either of the times he was there (and yes, he'd recognize the behaviour  ;D)

As for the birds not calling the bank home, well, that's crap, that's where they have been for the last two summers, just no nesting.  Which isn't surprising since Miracle moved to another nest and new mates don't always click in their first or even second year.

I will make a call to a friend who is on better terms with the Audubon folks and see if she has any news.  Will post if I hear anything.
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Bank of the West, Fargo, North Dakota / Fargo - 2018 / ? & ?
« Last post by Alison on October 20, 2018, 11:48 »
I have been unable to find information on the Fargo peregrines for 2018. No updates from Audubon, no news stories or other information.

The only somewhat relevant item is from July 2018 regarding the removal of the Bank of the West sign. I came across it this morning.

Bank facelift removes sign that previously housed Fargo's famous falcons

FARGO—A long-time sight in Downtown Fargo is in its final days.

As Bank of the West along Main Avenue undergoes a facelift, another mainstay is changing with it.

Cranes are busy removing and replacing the familiar lettering of the Bank of the West.

A manager of the bank tells WDAY the massive letters are being replaced with a new sign, which features the bank's parent company, BNP Paribas.

Within the next week, the familiar letters should be a thing of the past.

But the sign may be known as much for birds, as it is for a bear.

Since the early 90's, peregrine falcons called the massive sign home, nestling up right in the lettering, in a man-made nest box.

A website dedicated to the "Fargo Falcons" popped up in the past, even a live stream of the nest for people to enjoy, thanks to Audubon Dakota.

But the famous flyers haven't called the bank home for a few years.

Metro falcons have been more keen to call the Anheuser-Busch plant home in recent years.

After speaking with Audubon Dakota, it's not immediately clear what the sign change means for the future of Falcons in the Fargo skyline.


http://www.wday.com/news/4474589-bank-facelift-removes-sign-previously-housed-fargos-famous-falcons
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Logan Peregrines / Re: Logan - 2018 / Hart & Spencer
« Last post by Alison on October 20, 2018, 10:50 »
I am wondering if the chicks at this nest were named? And also whether there are any updates or sightings of them.
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West Winnipeg Peregrines / Re: West Winnipeg - 2018 / Ty & Ella
« Last post by Alison on October 20, 2018, 10:47 »
Are there any updates available for this site? Any more sightings of Fidler (love the name)?
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McKenzie Seeds Peregrines / Re: McKenzie Seeds - 2018 / Sol & Hurricane
« Last post by Alison on October 20, 2018, 10:44 »
Thank you for the update and excellent photos, RCF! Sol and Hurricane are both beautiful birds. I am sorry that they did not have chicks this year.

I hope next year will be much more successful for them.
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USA Peregrines / Re: Texas / Austin - 2018 / ? & Tower Girl
« Last post by Alison on October 20, 2018, 08:00 »
Given that Radisson had a summer home in Texas last winter, it does beg the question if Tower Girl's companions are banded and if so where they might be from.  Who knows, might be one another one of ours ... heavens know they seem to like hanging out in Texas.

It is always possible that one or more of the males who make a stop in Austin during the winter could be one of yours. I do check the nest from time to time, but have not seen any visitors at the nest recently. The cam has remained live during the year.

During the last breeding season, I did not see any banded male at the nest. I am pretty sure that the male who stayed for a while was unbanded.

I thought there was already an active thread for this site, but did not find one. The images I posted are from my archives earlier this year.

Texas certainly is a favourite area for many peregrines in winter: particularly Austin, San Antonio and Dallas (where a 2017 juvie from the Kansas City, Missouri, nest spent part of last winter). And not to forget Lewis, with his annual sojourn in The Woodlands, Texas.
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USA Peregrines / Re: Texas / Austin - 2018 / ? & Tower Girl
« Last post by The Peregrine Chick on October 19, 2018, 16:14 »
Given that Radisson had a summer home in Texas last winter, it does beg the question if Tower Girl's companions are banded and if so where they might be from.  Who knows, might be one another one of ours ... heavens know they seem to like hanging out in Texas.
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USA Peregrines / Re: Texas / Austin - 2018 / ? & Tower Girl
« Last post by Alison on October 19, 2018, 12:01 »
An article on Tower Girl, posted yesterday:

Resident peregrine falcon “Tower Girl” hosts two other falcons sparking speculation in future of local population

By Jackson Barton

Perched atop the 307-foot UT Tower, “Tower Girl,” the University’s resident peregrine falcon, captivated bird enthusiasts with her first appearance in two weeks on Oct. 3, notably with two other peregrine falcons. Audience members witnessed the social event up close through the Biodiversity Center’s “Falcon Cam.”

Nicole Elmer, the center’s administrative associate, displays one of Tower Girl’s feathers on her desk. Elmer said she witnessed the trio flying around the Tower during the foggy afternoon.

“It was pretty exciting,” Elmer said. “I hadn’t seen her in a long time.”

Integrative biology professor Timothy Keitt, who teaches a class in biology of birds and answers questions about Tower Girl, said it is not uncommon for Tower Girl to host migrating falcons in the fall, which is outside mating season for peregrine falcons.

“In past years, migrating males have visited the Tower and even mated with Tower Girl,” Keitt said. “It’s a bit early as egg laying is typically in April.”

Unlike other peregrine falcons, Tower Girl does not migrate south for the winter. Keitt said this could be due to a scar indicating a possible wing injury.

“It may be something that begins to be painful after a very long flight,” Keitt said. “Birds do strange things. There are many, many exceptions in the bird world and in most of nature itself.”

Spearheaded by Elmer and UT alumnus Bruce Calder, the Falcon Cam went live in March. Calder, who graduated in 1981, has been closely involved with Tower Girl since he spotted her on campus summer 2013.

“This was stunning to me since peregrine falcons are not known to inhabit Central Texas during midsummer,” Calder said in an email.

After constructing multiple nesting boxes, Calder observed Tower Girl with her eggs in the tower nesting box for three years, none of which hatched because they may have been infertile. Calder said Tower Girl has apparently only been “hooking up” with other males passing through Austin, and she will need to form a permanent bond for a successful breeding season.

Calder said if Tower Girl successfully hatches and raises her young to adulthood, it could mark the beginning of a permanent peregrine population in Central Texas. If Tower Girl mothers a new generation of falcons, Calder said he wants the University to take credit.

“It never was about me,” Calder said. “But instead is about UT encouraging the propagation of a rare and formerly endangered species.”


http://dailytexanonline.com/2018/10/18/resident-peregrine-falcon-%E2%80%9Ctower-girl%E2%80%9D-hosts-two-other-falcons-sparking-speculation-in
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