Author Topic: News: Waterbirds & Waterfowl  (Read 8522 times)

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Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Waterbirds & Waterfowl
« Reply #75 on: June 03, 2019, 11:05 »
Third story today all looking at extinction events ... one is interesting but not really back from extinction, one is sad because we've let it get this far, maybe too far and the third, this one, a good news story, but with still a long way to go considering what caused their decline in the first place ...

Endangered bird returns to South Korea 40 years after extinction
John Sharman, The Independent / 22 May 2019



The endangered crested ibis has reportedly been reintroduced to South Korea 40 years after it went extinct in the Asian country.

Forty of the rare wading birds were bred in captivity before being released into the wild at Upo Wetland in South Gyeongsang province, southeast of Seoul, the Yonhap news agency reported. 

The last time a crested ibis was spotted on the Korean peninsula is believed to have been in 1979 when it was spotted in the demilitarised zone separating the south from North Korea.

The bird used to be a common sight until pesticide use reportedly damaged its food sources.

A designated national monument in South Korea, it is also seen in China and Japan.

The captive population in South Korea has now reached 363, according to the Agence France-Presse news agency.

The breeding programme began with a birds donated by Beijing.

In South Korea the crested ibis is linked to an eponymous popular children’s song, composed when Japan ruled the country.


source: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/crested-ibis-south-korea-endangered-return-extinct-a8925846.html

Offline dupre501

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Re: News: Waterbirds & Waterfowl
« Reply #76 on: June 04, 2019, 16:40 »
'Goose Kindergarten' video goes viral
Dozens of Canada geese stopped traffic in Winnipeg, Manitoba this week.

In the video above two adult geese cross the road with dozens of goslings in tow. The footage was submitted to The Weather Network by Ed Solinske, and it's become a viral hit, racking up thousands of views.

The average Canada goose lays between 2 and 9 eggs each season but it isn't uncommon to see parents wandering the streets with two or three dozen goslings.

What you're seeing in the video above is referred to as a creche.

Canada geese will sometimes babysit, bringing goslings together in a kindergarten-style format.

Geese do this because there's safety in numbers. A group of goslings is far less vulnerable than one that's roaming solo.

It also frees up mature geese, allowing them to keep a protective eye over the entire flock.


https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/goose-kindergarten-video-goes-viral-creche
« Last Edit: June 04, 2019, 16:42 by dupre501 »

Offline carly

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Re: News: Waterbirds & Waterfowl
« Reply #77 on: June 04, 2019, 17:41 »
Wow what an awesome sight to see!  Thank you for sharing that dupre501!

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Waterbirds & Waterfowl
« Reply #78 on: November 06, 2020, 10:10 »
Feel good story for a colder Friday ....

Team rescues Canada goose from icy pond

You will want to watch the video!!

This pond is from one of the constructed wetlands in one of the newer housing developments in Winnipeg.  The wetlands are constructed to act was stormwater systems but also work as wetlands cleaning the water and providing habitat for wildlife.  Interestingly, because it is a wetland with wetland vegetation in/around it rather than a pond with grass running to/near the water's edge, geese don't nest here - they move off to places where the vegetation is lower so they can see what might be coming to raid their nests.  These constructed wetlands are pretty neat actually, they are built usually before even the roads are installed so by the time the houses are being built, they are already doing their job to hold excess water and filter the water at the same time - so rarely are there algae blooms!  They also provide green spaces for residents, habitat for all sorts of wildlife - from the smallest water invertebrates to mammals of all sizes to a huge array of birds species.  They aren't mowed or cut back like more managed vegetation spaces rather they are "managed" with controlled burns every number of years to take out the accumulated old/dead vegetation which promotes healthy regeneration and prevents any particular plant species (including invasive species) from overwhelming the rest of the native plants which in turn helps keep the wetland healthy. 

As you can tell, I think these constructed wetlands in urban areas are kind of neat  ;)