Author Topic: News: Owls  (Read 8099 times)

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Offline Alison

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News: Owls
« on: November 12, 2009, 20:42 »
Owl takes a break on North Sea platform

A migrating owl caused a stir after landing on a North Sea oil platform.

Workers on Brae Bravo thought it was a hoot when they found the long-eared owl, which was covered in grease and oil.  Staff on the Marathon Oil installation cleaned up the owl, fed and watered it and sent it on a boat to be cared for at a rescue centre.  

Today an RSPB expert said the nocturnal creature would have been migrating south for the winter – and decided to have a rest on the way.  Hywel Maggs, the RSPB’s regional farmland birds officer, described the bird as a “stowaway” on the platform, which is 130 miles off the coast of Aberdeen.  

Mr Maggs said: “The long-eared owl is a resident species in the UK but also in northern Europe.  
“Birds from Northern Europe and Scandinavia will be migrating during the Autumn to the UK and further south. And this bird would have been on its way to its wintering ground. The owl has ended up on a platform as quite often birds that are on route will stop off wherever possible.”

The bird, which has distinctive long ears and piercing orange eyes, was dubbed Ollie by staff on the platform.  Mr Maggs said the stop-off-point in the open sea would have been too much of a temptation to resist for the owl.  And he said the main reason for the bird’s stop would have been to have a break from its journey.


 

http://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/Article.aspx/1476084?UserKey=
« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 16:15 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2009, 20:53 »
Great Horned Owl at Raptor Education Group improving

On October 24, a young female Great Horned Owl was admitted to REGI. From the site:

Later this evening we admitted a beautiful young female Great-horned Owl that had been shot. She was lucky to have been found by caring people that called and brought her to REGI as soon as they could. The owl weighs only 2 lbs which is well under her normal weight. She is anemic and was dehydrated as well. She was stabilized and put in a heated box for the night. Tomorrow we will have a better idea as to her prognosis. Shooting is illegal for these state and federally protected birds but it seems there are those out there that either don't understand that or don't care. It is a sad statement for our society.



Today's update is much more encouraging:

This Great-horned Owl in the photo [below] is a great story. She was admitted after she was shot. She was not found for several days or more after the incident. By the time she arrived she was suffering from starvation. The starvation was so advanced we were fairly certain she would not be able to survive. The young owl surprised us with her pluck and determination. She is now eating on her own and beginning to fly. She has months of rehabilitation ahead of her before release. She will likely be with us through the winter season. When a bird is starved, the flight muscles are atrophied. They are unable to fly. That is why our exercise flights are so important as they need to build their muscles up to a normal state.



http://raptoreducationgroup.blogspot.com/

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2009, 22:15 »
Owl Caught In Trap To Be Euthanized

Trapped Owl Found In Moodus

DEEP RIVER, Conn. -- An animal rehabilitation center in Deep River said it cannot save an owl found in a steel-jaw leg-hold trap and will have to euthanize the bird.

The barred owl was found on Clark Gate Road in Moodus Wednesday with a trapping device hanging from its right foot.

Officials captured the bird and took it to Deep River, where it will be euthanized Friday morning.

A similar incident sparked outrage among animal activists in January. The rehabilitation center, A Place Called Hope, called for a ban of the traps, but the law never made it past the Judiciary Committee.

Members of the center said they will continue to push for the traps to be made illegal.

http://www.wfsb.com/news/21735507/detail.html

There is a video of the owl at the link - what a beautiful Barred Owl. This is just so very sad.

 

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2009, 21:01 »
A reward has been offered for information about the trapping of a Barred Owl last week (see post above):

The Humane Society of the United States is offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for trapping a federally protected owl in Moodus last week.  

Residents found the owl struggling on Clarke Gate Road in Moodus on Wednesday. A wildlife rehabilititor captured the bird and found a rusty leghold trap clamped tightly to the owl's foot.  The injury was so bad that the owl was euthanized Friday. Trapping a federally protected bird, such as a barred owl, is a federal offense under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Anyone with information about the case can call the Department of Environmental Protection at (860)424-3333.


I hope they find the individual responsible and pursue this to the full extent of the law.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2010, 12:23 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2009, 19:42 »
California: SPCA for Monterey County rescues barn owl

The SPCA for Monterey County performed an emergency wildlife rescue this morning on El Paso Road in Salinas.

A barn owl was tangled in fishing line and unable to fly. The call originally came in to rescue an owl trapped in a barbed wire fence, but this is not what SPCA Wildlife Center Technicians found on arrival to the scene.

The rescue went smoothly and caretakers are hopeful the barn owl will be able to be released soon. Examination at the SPCA Wildlife Center revealed no fractures or dislocations, but the owl is favoring that wing so are closely monitoring the situation.

The SPCA for Monterey County is a nonprofit, independent, donor-supported humane society that has been serving the animals and people of Monterey County since 1905. They are not a chapter of any other agency and they do not have apparent organization. They shelter homeless, neglected and abused pets and livestock, and provide humane education and countless other services to the community. They are the local agency you call to investigate animal cruelty, rescue and rehabilitate injured wildlife, and aid domestic animals in distress.

The SPCA Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center is the only full service wildlife rehabilitation center serving Monterey County. The SPCA Wildlife Center’s professional staff operates under permits from the California Department of Fish & Game and rescues over 2,600 wild animals every year.


Online at www.SPCAmc.org.

http://www.thecalifornian.com/article/20091217/NEWS01/91217023/1002/SPCA+for+Monterey+County+rescues+barn+owl

 
« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 16:14 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2010, 19:53 »
Injured Great Horned Owl Rescued from Train Tracks

CALGARY - C-Train operator Warren Duclan was pulling into the Bridgeland station for his first morning run on Tuesday when a shadow crossed the tracks. A large bird had swooped down from westbound Memorial Drive and slid under the platform a few feet before him. Duclan instantly put on the brakes and prayed he wouldn't hit the creature.

After apologizing for the delay to his passengers, Duclan climbed under the platform and spotted the two large yellow eyes of an injured female great horned owl peering back at him.

"She was flopping and struggling and trying to get away from me, but I think with the injuries she had, she couldn't get away. She was pretty weak and wet," he said. Duclan wrapped the approximately two-year-old female owl in his blue Calgary Transit vest to keep it warm before bringing her into the train's cab and calling for help.

In a stroke of luck, Calgary Transit supervisor Brian Moreland happened to be on duty. Moreland has spent the last six years volunteering with the Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society, a non-profit that rescues and rehabilitates wild animals. He was relieved to see the 1.81-kilogram bird was relatively docile and secure when he met up with Duclan's train downtown.

"I'm fairly certain she was probably hit by a car on Memorial Drive and then flew over into the right-of-way. There have been numerous incidents of owls and birds of prey hit by vehicles in city limits," said Moreland.

The injured owl was taken to the Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society for treatment. Her prognosis looks good, said wildlife technician Sara Jordan-McLachlan.

"There is a right-wing fracture, but other than that she looks in pretty good shape. We'll have to do further exams and hopefully we can fix her up," said Jordan-McLachlan.  The rehabilitation society treats and then releases injured birds and small animals. Unfortunately, calls to rescue a wounded owl aren't uncommon in Calgary.  The non-profit group receives one every three weeks or so, said Jordan-McLachlan.

While they have the veterinary staff to offer treatment, the rehabilitation society depends on volunteers to alert it to an animal in need, said Moreland.

"It is always invaluable to have people step up to the plate and help rather than look the other way. He certainly knew what he was doing. It was fantastic for the owl," he said.  

Duclan is just relieved the owl will get the help she requires to return to the wild. "I'm happy she's doing better now and she will hopefully manage to get back her strength and get back to flying soon," he said.


http://www.calgaryherald.com/health/Train+driver+rescues+wounded/2391155/story.html
 

 
« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 16:14 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2010, 20:04 »
Two barred owls, each of whom had been hit by a car, have been taken in by REGI.

Here is one of them; they are such beautiful birds:



http://raptoreducationgroup.blogspot.com/


Offline Alison

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2010, 18:48 »
Hoo-Hooo! You Chopped Down Our Home

Reunited owl family a reminder of wildlife laws
By JESSICA GREENE

A pair of baby barn owls accidentally left for dead are on the mend in the South Bay.

The birds, only a couple weeks old, were found on the ground Tuesday in San Jose after a trimming tree company cut down the palm tree where they lived, WildRescue's Rebecca Dmytryk said. The parents flew away.

A passerby spotted the owlets on the side of the road and called rescuers. There were three babies but one died before the rescue effort got in full swing.

Experts at the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley took the birds under their wings for the next few days. They had to rehydrate and feed the babies and get them ready for their final step -- heading back to a place where their parents could take over. They built a box for the owlets and mounted it on a post in the same yard and waited for the parents to come back.

On Friday, they did. The family reunion went well and after a few adjustments to the new nest on Saturday, the family looks to be on their way back to normal. Barn owls are resilient, Dmytryk says, and will be able to make up for the time apart easily. The man who owns the property was happy to help. He said he had no idea owls were living in his palm tree.

Barn owls are protected under the Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Disturbing them is a federal crime and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife  Service could become involved in an investigation.

The landscaping company hired to do the trimming was surprised to hear they could be in trouble. They had a permit from the city, they told us by phone Saturday night, and said they were doing what they were supposed to do. A representative from the company said the trimmer saw an adult owl fly out when they were knocking the tree down then saw two others fly away so they kept cutting. He said he didn't see any babies, and if he had, he would have taken them for help.

But Dmytryk said the babies are far from ready for flying. "They're like little grapefruits with fuzz on them." While she doubts the tree trimmer's story, she says it serves as a valuable lesson for that company and helps get the word out about the importance of the laws.


http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local-beat/Whooooo-Cut-Down-Our-Home-90547879.html


« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 16:16 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2010, 18:19 »
Owl adopts ducklings born in 30ft-high nest

A tawny owl is acting as surrogate mother to two ducklings born 30ft (9.1m) up a tree after their natural mother laid her eggs in the wrong nest.

Mary Hartley was expecting to see owlets after four eggs appeared in her nest box in Marple Bridge, Stockport. But when she checked a nest box camera she was surprised to find two Mandarin ducklings jumping around inside. Despite the perilous height of the box, Mrs Hartley said they would eventually climb out and "float down".

The bird enthusiast has had owls nesting in her garden for the past 25 years.

'Very caring'

Two owlets, also born in the nest, are being cared for by the mother alongside the two-day-old ducklings. Speaking to the BBC, Mrs Hartley said: "We think that the mandarin duck must have gone into the box - because we have two pairs of mandarins - and laid her eggs and suddenly realised it was the owl box.

"Because when the owl came back she then laid her own eggs in the box - confusion all round."

But even though the ducklings' surrogate mother is a predator, she has shown no sign of aggression towards them.

"She's been very good," Mrs Hartley said. "She's been very caring, although it does confuse her a little when she tries to feed them with meat - because of course they don't like it."

Another mandarin duck has already successfully raised 13 ducklings born in another - albeit empty - owl box in the garden, leading Mrs Hartley to believe the current pair will survive.

"They all managed to jump out of the box on their own as mother calls them," Mrs Hartley added. "And because the box is 30ft up the tree it's quite exciting as she waits at the bottom to see if they can float down and she can take them to the stream."


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/manchester/8682411.stm

« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 16:59 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2012, 11:28 »
Birders setting safety aside to catch rare glimpse of Great Grey Owl, police say
by the Canadian Press / 10 January 2012

Birdwatchers flocking to southwestern Ontario to view a Great Grey Owl are causing provincial police some concerns.Police say the presence of the owl in the Kingsville area has drawn attention from all over the country and the U.S.

Full article & photo: Birders setting safety aside to catch rare glimpse of great grey owl

Offline photosbydennis

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2012, 18:52 »
Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm...sure thinking about taking a few days off and heading to Kingsville  ???

Offline eagle63_1999

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2012, 11:17 »
Really Dennis?  I am hoping to get down there in a week or so.  Wishing us both good luck on that venture!

Offline photosbydennis

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2012, 18:32 »
Good LUCK Eagle...do send photos  ;)

Offline Pam

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2012, 23:06 »
This is a story my sister sent me regarding the amazing number of Snowy Owl sightings in the USA this year - including one in Hawaii around American Thanksgiving......she knew we were heading there in January:

http://www.nola.com/pets/index.ssf/2012/01/like_magic_harry_potters_snowy.html

And unfortunately, this is the follow-up story that my husband found in a Hawaii newspaper while we were there:




Hard to believe...and very sad!

Offline Jazzerkins

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #14 on: February 05, 2012, 06:18 »
That's absolutely horrible.  :'( Surely there was some other way than killing this poor bird!

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2012, 22:23 »
A Snowy Owl was released back into the wild near Stonewall, Manitoba today, after months of recovery at the Prairie Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre. The owl had been hit by a car on Nov. 26, resulting in an injured hip. Stonewall Mayor Ross Thompson released the owl...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TD9A1T-BUUQ&feature=youtu.be

Offline photosbydennis

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2012, 07:49 »
Thought folks might be interested in reading.

http://www.nabirding.com/2012/02/16/when-a-snowy-met-the-locals/

Offline irenekl

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2012, 09:44 »
Incredible story & pictures, thanks for sharing!

Offline bcbird

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #18 on: March 31, 2012, 14:17 »
The snowy's talons really impress me, at least!
Thanks, Dennis.

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #19 on: April 01, 2012, 19:57 »
Thought folks might be interested in reading.

http://www.nabirding.com/2012/02/16/when-a-snowy-met-the-locals/

Interesting article, Dennis. Thanks! :)

Offline sami

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2012, 00:19 »
Haven't seen any snowies on my way home from Selkirk for a couple of weeks now, but did see a rather large bird take off from a pole in the general area where I've seen snowies. Couldn't get a good look at it, definitely bigger than a raven or hawk, but not as big as an eagle. All I could really tell was that it was fairly dark in colour. Might it have been a large owl? Do they sit up on hydro poles along highways in open prairie?

Offline photosbydennis

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2012, 07:10 »
Possible but not likely an owl during the day and I don't believe they are pole perchers...could have been another raptor  ???

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2013, 18:30 »
BC shooting one owl species to save another
Dene Moore, The Associated Press
27 Jan 2013, The Metro News


VANCOUVER – The British Columbia government has approved the shooting one species of owl in a last-ditch effort to save their endangered cousins, as the number of northern spotted owls continues to decline decades after they became the mascot of the “War in the Woods” over old-growth logging.

Northern spotted owls are on the brink of extinction in Canada, with only 10 birds remaining in the wild in southwestern B.C., according to some estimates.

The situation is so grave that over the past five years the provincial Forests and Lands Ministry has relocated 73 and authorized the shooting of 39 barred owls, the larger and more aggressive bird encroaching on the spotted owls’ limited habitat.

“Barred owls have invaded all spotted owl habitat,” said Ian Blackburn, the provincial government’s spotted owl recovery co-ordinator.

Relocation or elimination of barred owls is limited to a five-kilometre radius around areas where spotted owls have recently been confirmed, or areas being considered for reintroduction from a captive breeding program.



Read the rest of the story here:  http://metronews.ca/news/canada/525988/b-c-shooting-one-owl-species-to-save-another/

Offline Elaine L

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2013, 22:39 »
This is so discouraging.  If only governments had set aside suitable land years ago, we would not have this situation now.  I cannot imagine how we could come to the point where we have to kill one species in the hope that another will survive.  I just don't know what to say, except that the politics of greed just never ends.

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2013, 23:06 »
I hear you, Elaine. It really is too bad that it has come to this.  >:(

Offline bcbird

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2013, 11:49 »
An appalling decision.   

Offline Jazzerkins

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2013, 07:06 »
Great story in today's Free Press about the Great Greys in Manitoba.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/fyi/greys-anatomy-200693471.html

Offline moka

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2013, 11:02 »
Very interesting article, thank you.

Dennis met a couple studying owls this winter... wonder if it's the same couple.

Offline photosbydennis

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2013, 11:06 »

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #29 on: March 30, 2013, 21:24 »
Yes! And about a month ago, I attended an Owl Workshop that Jim Duncan was giving at McNally-Robinson Community Classroom. It was very interesting and he even brought in a Great Horned Owl, I think, that he & his wife had rescued and who now lives in their house with them! He said it sometimes flies around in their kitchen! :o

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Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #31 on: December 10, 2013, 15:55 »
Shaking my head.

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2013/12/09/report-port-authority-targeting-snowy-owls-at-jfk/

This kind of mass numbers is called an irruption as I recall ... there are a lot of snowies in New Brunswick as well.  A biologist I know suggested the cause might have been good small mammal numbers last year so many more owls have to go further to find food.  Likely he is right.

Offline dupre501

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #32 on: December 21, 2013, 15:43 »
TPC previously posted -
Quote
BC shooting one owl species to save another
So not just in BC, but in the US as well.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/u-s-begins-killing-barred-owls-to-help-spotted-owl-1.2472489

Offline RCF

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #33 on: December 29, 2013, 21:22 »
 LOUISVILLE, Ky
Snowy owl rescued after being spotted near Westport Road


“The morning we caught him he was standing next to the pavement trucks [and they] were going by him, he wasn’t moving,” Sally Seyal from Raptor Rehabilitation of Kentucky said.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/video/snowy-owl-rescued-being-spotted-012103894.html


Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #34 on: January 03, 2014, 14:25 »
Great horned owls set bodies to defrost
by Jan Bergstrom, South Carolina Times / 3 Jan 2014

Imagine being outside 24 hours a day, in January, in Minnesota. Imagine being an accomplished hunter, capable of caching extra food to get you through hard times. Then imagine having no source of heat to thaw this lifesaving cache to make it edible. What would you do?

If you were a great horned owl, you would incubate it. Great horned owls regularly stash extra food, but their razor sharp bills are made for shredding and tearing, not hammering away at a frozen piece of meat. Lacking any other way of breaking up the food, it does what any self-respecting predator would do: It sits on it until it thaws.

This is just one of the great horned owl’s adaptations that makes it master of the winter woods. Every inch of its body is adapted to surviving our cold, stressful winters.

More tricks

Owls’ facial discs consist of feathers that funnel sound toward their ears, allowing them to hear sounds that are one-tenth the volume that humans are capable of hearing. Their ears are small holes, one slightly larger and one slightly higher than the other. This allows sound to reach their ears at different times, allowing them to pinpoint the exact distance as well as the direction of the sound, even under a dense blanket of snow. Their hearing is so keen, they can hunt almost entirely by ear.

Great horned owls grow more camouflaged feathers in the winter to keep out the cold air. They seem oblivious to the brutal conditions. This allows them to perch tirelessly on branches, waiting for unsuspecting prey to venture into their territory. They also can cruise the night skies without going into a state of lowered metabolism like many other winter birds.

The front edges of the owl’s primary flight feathers are fringed, allowing air to pass noiselessly over them. Their prey never hears them coming as they swoop in for the prize.

Diet, habitat

Although mammals such as rabbits, squirrels, weasels, mice and cats make up 75 percent of the great horned owl’s diet, they also prey upon more than 50 species of birds. Songbirds in the winter huddle at night, often going into a state of controlled hypothermia. They seek refuge among dense branches of trees or beneath loose, peeling bark. Oblivious to the outside world, their heart rate decreases, breathing slows and metabolism drops. Picking the wrong spot can be fatal. Great horned owls use their superb vision to spot the sleeping avians, plucking them before they can even wake up.

Great horned owls have the largest range of any owl in North America. They are equally content in woods, fields, desert, grasslands, suburbs and just about any place south of the polar tree line. In our area, they tend to prefer farmland mixed with wooded areas, although they can be found anywhere, 24 hours a day, even in the winter. Keep your eyes open and you just may see one “incubating” its supper.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #35 on: January 03, 2014, 14:45 »
It IS all about the Snowy Owls this winter ... text, photos & videos

Northeast States See Large Influx of Snowy Owls this Winter
James Foley, Nature World News / 30 Dec 2013
http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/5463/20131230/northeast-states-see-large-influx-snowy-owls-winter.htm

It’s all about the Snowy Owls this winter - Lots of locations to spot these beauties - Ontario
Bruce Di Labio, Ottawa Citizen / 2 Jan 2014
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/life/about+Snowy+Owls+this+winter/9343092/story.html

Snowy Owls Head South In Biggest Numbers In 50 Years - Connecticut
Patrick Skahill, Boston National Public Radio / 3 Jan 2014
http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2014/01/03/snowy-owls-connecticut

Invasion of snowy owls into Pennsylvania and other states targeted by Project SNOWstorm - Pennsylvania
Marcus Schneck, The Patriot-News / 3 Jan 2014
http://blog.pennlive.com/wildaboutpa/2014/01/invasion_of_snowy_owls_into_pe.html


... and more to come I'm sure ...

* note of explanation, birders use 4 letter abbreviations for bird species - SNOW is short for Snowy Owl

Offline Jazzerkins

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #36 on: January 03, 2014, 16:10 »


click on image to see slideshow/larger image

Great Horned Owl

Offline GCG

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #37 on: May 29, 2014, 13:52 »
 ;D ;D I read this incredible news about an exhibit at the Assiniboine Zoo. Even at my age, I WILL visit the zoo this year.

Snowy owl habitat gets $500K
Winnipeg Sun

http://www.winnipegsun.com/2014/05/28/snowy-owl-habitat-gets-500k


Dennis, you may be able to get your photo ops without standing in horrific weather.  ::) :D
« Last Edit: May 29, 2014, 13:54 by gemcitygemini »

Offline allikat

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #38 on: May 30, 2014, 22:23 »
Even though the subject line reads as, "Snowy Owls exhibit"....apparently the Assiniboine Zoo is going through a massive reno, and the Polar Bear exhibit is supposed to be the best in the world and state of the art!

The Snowy Owl exhibit will absolutely be fun to see!


Offline GCG

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #39 on: August 19, 2014, 05:40 »
Owl enters 10th story apartment, kills pet in Idaho
CBS news

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/owl-enters-10th-story-apartment-kills-pet-in-idaho/

  :(

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #40 on: August 19, 2014, 20:20 »
Holy moly! Hard to believe this could happen! :o

Offline birdcamfan

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #41 on: August 23, 2014, 07:41 »
The other canary seemed jumpy and anxious....poor thing just saw its life flash before its eyes



Offline Kinderchick

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Re: Curious baby owl investigate camera
« Reply #44 on: September 30, 2014, 22:19 »
Hmmm... I clicked on this link & can't seem to locate the baby owl video. :-\

Offline GCG

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PBS, Nature - Owls Program
« Reply #45 on: February 18, 2015, 14:11 »
 :) A very close friend (and avid birder) sent me information about PBS and the series Nature. An episode about OWLS will be shown tonight at 7:00 P.M. CST. Finally, TV worth watching.  :) :)

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/owl-power/11628/

Offline GCG

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CBC Radio video of an imprinted owl from nest in Winnipeg
« Reply #46 on: March 25, 2015, 04:32 »
http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Canada/Manitoba/ID/2660487878/

Interesting video from CBC Radio interview. In addition, they are asking people to report owl sightings. Dennis, Michael....?


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/hoo-hoo-are-you-hearing-at-night-manitoba-wants-your-owl-count-1.3007370
« Last Edit: March 25, 2015, 04:37 by gemcitygemini »

Offline GCG

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Offline GCG

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« Last Edit: November 09, 2015, 05:20 by gemcitygemini »

Offline GCG

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Re: Snowy Owls
« Reply #49 on: December 08, 2015, 09:05 »

Offline Moonstar

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Re: Snowy Owls
« Reply #50 on: December 10, 2015, 12:25 »
So sad.  They are such gorgeous birds.

Offline GCG

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« Last Edit: December 19, 2015, 07:13 by gemcitygemini »

Offline GCG

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Re: Snowy Owls
« Reply #52 on: December 27, 2015, 10:00 »
Yesterday, December 26th, 2 more Snowy Owls were released at Oak Hammock Marsh. Saw this on the CBC site with a video.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/rehabilitated-snowy-owls-released-manitoba-1.3380384

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Snowy Owls
« Reply #53 on: January 08, 2016, 01:02 »
Video / Snowy owl spotted soaring by Montreal traffic camera
CBC News / Jan 07, 2016 10:55 AM ET



Spectacular images of a snowy owl in flight have been captured by Transport Quebec's traffic camera along Montreal's Highway 40.
The images were captured on Jan. 3 by a traffic camera at Highway 40 and Sources Boulevard.


Check out the rest of the story and the video at http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/snowy-owl-flying-transport-quebec-traffic-camera-1.3393343

Offline GCG

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Re: Snowy Owls
« Reply #54 on: January 08, 2016, 04:48 »
 :o  So beautiful! Thanks for posting this video, TPC! :)

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #55 on: May 01, 2016, 14:43 »
PBS - Nature - Owl Power

If you haven't had a chance, it is well worth the hour to watch Nature's "Owl Power" episode.  

Unfortunately, if you live in Canada, you can't watch the program online and at the moment, I don't know when it will be played again.  But add it to your "to watch" list.  Great mix of birds, people and birds and the science of owls (thermal images of owls at night & the true silence of barn owl wings).

if you are in the US the link is: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/owl-power-full-episode/11636/

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #56 on: February 26, 2018, 11:06 »
Rare Snowy Owl Spotted In Fort Worth
CBC DFW / 23 Feb 2018


Snowy owl spotted in Fort Worth. (Credit: Ben Sandifer)

FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) – A wild snowy owl was spotted in Fort Worth Thursday — a rare sighting for the species in North Texas.  Ben Sandifer filmed video of the owl, saying it was found in a large shopping center near I-35 in North Fort Worth. He said it was healthy and was flying, hunting and preening. According to Sandifer, the owl is known for having feathers with no pigment, aiding them in their habitat.


Source:  http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2018/02/23/snowy-owl-fort-worth/

Check this out, there is a short video (can show at top or bottom right corner of screen) - some hardcore photographers there - not sure how camo helps in the parking lot of the Courtyard Marriott in Texas though ... they do look very pleased to catch some photos of the little white darling though  ;D

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #57 on: June 21, 2018, 13:46 »
This owl had an extraordinary survival story after a very bad day
By Karin Brulliard (Washington Post) reprinted in the Grand Forks Herald, May 8, 2018


Owl shortly after a driver found it trapped in the grille of his truck. Courtesy of PAWS.

A great horned owl can take down prey larger than itself: Skunks, wild turkeys, the occasional cat. Its sharp and powerful talons can crush its chosen dinner.  Among the few things that can take down a great horned owl are vehicles, which smack birds in the wrong place at the wrong time with a few tons of steel and highway-speed force. But no one told that to 2017-4242, the case number of one particularly resilient owl treated at a Seattle-area wildlife rehabilitation clinic this winter.

This bird survived being slammed by a Ford F-150 on a very chilly night. Then it survived being wedged in the truck's grille for nearly 300 miles.  Then it made it through a spraying and whizzing carwash -- all while still stuck in that grille.  It was, to say the least, a very bad, very harrowing experience. After all of that, more than two months of rehabilitation for a mangled wing must have seemed like no big deal.  "Oh, he stood out," said Jennifer Convy, director of the PAWS Wildlife Center in Lynnwood, Washington. "He's unusual."

The saga of this raptor - which the clinic staff referred to as "he," though they did not determine gender - began when it arrived at PAWS in November. The center treats about 4,000 injured animals a year, half of them birds. This patient's left humerus was broken, leaving its dappled gray wing "twisted around," Convy said. The left of its piercing, golden eyes was dilated and had a hemorrhage, probably as a result of the truck's impact.


The owl gets an eye exam before being released to the wild. Courtesy of PAWS.

A colleague of the driver had brought the owl in, Convy said, and relayed that he had been driving in Eastern Washington when he collided with a bird. Assuming it was a goner, he continued nearly 300 miles to a Seattle suburb, where he parked the truck overnight. The next day, the driver took the truck through a carwash - the kind "with frontal sprays, whirling brushes and concussive winds," according to Audubon, which first reported the owl's tale - and then drove to work. It was there that he noticed his licensed plate was bent and that something feathered and moving was near it.

The bird "was in pain," Naomi Summer, that driver's colleague, told Audubon. "Its wing was crumpled. It was cold and rainy. We really didn't expect it to survive."  But an examination at PAWS suggested otherwise. The owl's humerus was still viable, the nerves were still intact and the circulation good, Convy said.  2017-4242 spent about a month with its broken, pinned wing wrapped to its body. After the wing had healed sufficiently, the bird underwent physical therapy, which for owls involves sedation, massage and stretching. It was moved to enclosures where it could practice flying and, eventually, hunting live mice. Predictably, the owl won.  "It did beautifully," Convy said of the hunting trials.

The center has treated other birds trapped in grilles, but they typically don't survive. "Usually when an animal like that goes through such an ordeal, just the shock itself and the trauma is enough to send it over the edge, unfortunately," Convy said. The key to any wildlife rescue is getting the injured animal to a licensed rehab center quickly, which - epic road trip aside - happened fast enough in this case. Ironically, Convy added, the truck's grille might have protected the owl from both the elements and the carwash's highly chemical shower.

Earlier this year, a PAWS wildlife biologist and veterinarian drove the owl east over the Cascades, back to the region where its near-death experience began. A video shows the bird flying up to a leafless tree as honking geese soar overhead.

PAWS has dealt with other memorable cases, Convy noted. There was a large black bear that required hip surgery for a fractured femur before being returned to the great outdoors. Several seabirds, their feathers blackened by oil spills, have been cleaned up and released to the water. But in her 22 years at the center, she said she has never seen anything like 2017-4242.  "This owl was pretty popular here at the wildlife center, in that everyone was really rooting for the animal," she said. "This'll probably be a one-off."


The great horned owl after surgery to help repair a broken left wing. Courtesy of PAWS.



source: http://www.grandforksherald.com/sports/outdoors/4442826-owl-had-extraordinary-survival-story-after-very-bad-day

Offline Jazzerkins

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #58 on: June 22, 2018, 16:49 »
It is obvious this beautiful bird has a very strong will to live.  May "he" live a long, healthy life, free to fly as intended.

Offline dupre501

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #59 on: August 03, 2018, 12:46 »

Offline dupre501

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #60 on: August 03, 2018, 13:18 »

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #61 on: December 21, 2019, 09:45 »
'Mama, that ornament scared me': Family finds owl hiding in Christmas tree
Leah Asmelash / CNN / 19 Dec 2019

A Georgia family got a special holiday surprise last week after finding an owl hiding inside their Christmas tree.  The discovery came last Thursday evening when Katie McBride Newman and her two children, India and Jack, were finishing dinner.

India, 10, had started to clear the table and was in another room when Newman heard her exclaim, "Oh my gosh!"

"She comes very dramatically into the dining room and goes, 'Mama, that ornament scared me,'" Newman told CNN. "Then she bursts into tears."

Newman said she's a big fan of owls, so the tree actually had about a dozen owl ornaments gracing its branches. At first, Newman said she thought India had just been spooked by one of those.

So Newman checked it out, ready to calm her daughter's fears. But when she peered into the tree for the ornament, she saw the owl turn its head and look straight at her.

"And I'm like, 'Oh, that's a real owl,'" Newman said. Meanwhile, India had disappeared into the other room, in tears again.
 
Owl may have been in their tree for over a week
 
The family had purchased the tree from a store about two days after Thanksgiving, so at first they thought the owl must have flown in and taken refuge inside their tree, Newman's husband, Billy, told CNN.

The family left their windows and doors open that night, hoping the bird would leave on its own -- but it didn't.

The next day, they called the Chattahoochee Nature Center, a non-profit environmental center about an hour away from their home in Newnan. An employee there told them to leave the owl some raw chicken, concerned it may not have eaten in a few days.

The employee stopped by Saturday morning. She caught the bird and identified it as an Eastern screech owl, common in the Georgia area, a spokesperson for the nature center, Jon Copsey, told CNN. She also checked for injuries and gave it some food and nutritional supplements.

The owl was pretty thin, igniting the theory that the bird must have been inside the tree since they bought it, Billy Newman said.

Returning the owl to the wild
 
The employee left the family some instructions: Leave the bird in a crate in a darkened room and release it after dark.

At dusk on Saturday, the family left the open crate outside. By 9:30 p.m., the owl had disappeared.
Copsey said the family did everything right in the situation -- closing it off from the rest of the house, trying to help it escape on its own and calling a wildlife rehabilitation professional.

Katie Newman, though, says she swears she can still hear the owl at night, hooting away.


Source: https://beta.ctvnews.ca/national/lifestyle/2019/12/19/1_4736622.html
(Check out the photos!)

Offline irenekl

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #62 on: December 21, 2019, 20:20 »
Yikes!   Cool experience for this family but probably pretty awful for this owl. 

Offline GCG

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #63 on: December 26, 2019, 04:42 »
 ;D Remember the owl in the Christmas tree? As I start my day after Christmas, I see the following video. Yes! another owl story.
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/video/animals/owl-snatches-away-wrapper-from-cat-playing-with-it/vi-AAJASB0?ocid=sf LOL!

Offline GCG

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Re: News: Owls
« Reply #64 on: January 16, 2020, 15:18 »
I have absolutely no idea where this video was filmed, but it shows an owl delivering wedding rings to a groom. Source...MSN.com

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/video/watch/owl-incredibly-flies-down-the-aisle-to-deliver-wedding-rings-to-newlyweds/vi-BBYZHvS?ocid=ASUDHP
« Last Edit: January 16, 2020, 16:58 by GCG »