Author Topic: News: About Birds  (Read 8959 times)

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Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2012, 10:28 »
Three Cornell undergraduate ornithologists found and named a new species of Barbet ...

New Species Discovered by Cornell Grads, Named for Cornell Lab Director


And a longer article about the expedition itself ...

Stretching the Canvas

Offline RCF

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2012, 18:24 »
Puffin patrol rescues more birds than ever

The Puffin Patrol in Witless Bay, Newfoundland collected 37 disoriented puffin chicks, a record number, on Friday night, and released them into the wild on Saturday morning.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/story/2012/08/12/nl-puffin-patrol-more-rescues-812.html

Offline susha

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2012, 19:14 »
Wonderful story!  Thanks RCF!

Offline allikat

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #18 on: August 13, 2012, 00:01 »
Very cool story!  Thank you very much RCF for posting it!!!

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #19 on: August 13, 2012, 22:07 »
I love the Puffin Patrol story! Thanks for posting the link RCF!  :-*

Offline RCF

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2012, 20:44 »
Where is that titmouse going with all your sunflower seeds? How far will a chickadee travel for food in a day, or a month? Is "your" favorite nuthatch also a regular at someone else's feeders? We know surprisingly little about the habits of our most familiar birds

http://eepurl.com/o-tnH

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2013, 13:20 »
And she is at it again - at at least 62 years of age!!!

Mom again at 62: world's oldest wild bird hatches new chick
Albatross 'Wisdom' has raised 30 to 35 chicks so far
posted: 6 Feb 2013 - CBC News



(Wisdom on the left trying to nudge her younger mate off her egg in late November)

A wild bird believed to be the oldest in the world is still making babies and flying 80,000 kilometres a year in her seventh decade of life.

Wisdom, a Laysan albatross who nests in the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, about 2,800 kilometres northwest of Hawaii, hatched her latest newborn early Sunday morning, the U.S. Geological Survey repoprted in a news release.

Peter Leary, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist who observed the hatching, reported that the chick appeared to be healthy.

After returning from foraging at sea on November 29, 2012, Wisdom (left) attempts to nudge her mate off the nest for her turn at incubating the couple's egg. (Pete Leary/USFWS)Wisdom is at least 62 years old, but could be older than that. She was first banded by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1956 while incubating an egg, so she must have been old enough to breed by then.

Albatrosses typically breed starting at eight or nine years of age. But if Wisdom was an early breeder and started at age five — the earliest possible breeding age for her species — she would now be 62.

To her human followers, Wisdom is "simply incredible," says Bruce Peterjohn, chief of the USGS's North American Bird Banding Program.

"If she were human," he said, "she would be eligible for U.S. Medicare in a couple of years yet she is still regularly raising young and annually circumnavigating the Pacific Ocean."

According to the USGS, albatrosses lay one egg a year, although they occasionally take a year off from breeding. Peterjohn estimates that Wisdom has likely raised at least 30 to 35 chicks to date. Most recently, she has nested every year since 2008.

There are 21 known species of albatross in the world. The Laysan albatross is one of only two that are not considered to be threatened with extinction



Link to story: http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2013/02/05/technology-oldest-bird-albatross-wisdom.html

Offline susha

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2013, 19:15 »
This is astounding!  I love this :o

Offline bcbird

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2013, 22:52 »
Thanks, TPC.  

It's great to see this story continue.

Offline MayShowers

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2013, 12:30 »
Absolutely amazing!

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #25 on: February 10, 2013, 18:00 »
Incredible! :o What great genes she must have!

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #26 on: February 11, 2013, 12:39 »
How Birds Got Their UV Vision
Tanya Lewis, LiveScience - 11 Feb 2013

If optimists see the world through rose-colored lenses, some birds see it through ultraviolet ones. Avians have evolved ultraviolet vision quite a few times in history, a new study finds.

Birds depend on their color vision for selecting mates, hunting or foraging for food, and spotting predators. Until recently, ultraviolet vision was thought to have arisen as a one-time development in birds. But a new DNA analysis of 40 bird species, reported Feb. 11 in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, shows the shift between violet (shorter wavelengths on the electromagnetic spectrum) and ultraviolet vision has occurred at least 14 times.

"Birds see color in a different way from humans," study co-author Anders Ödeen, an animal ecologist at Uppsala University in Sweden, told LiveScience. Human eyes have three different color receptors, or cones, that are sensitive to light of different wavelengths and mix together to reveal all the colors we see. Birds, by contrast, have four cones, so "they see potentially more colors than humans do," Ödeen said.

Birds themselves are split into two groups based on the color of light (wavelength) that their cones detect most acutely. Scientists define them as violet-sensitive or ultraviolet-sensitive, and the two groups don't overlap, according to Ödeen. Birds of each group would see the same objects as different hues.

The specialization of color vision has its advantages. For instance, a bird with ultraviolet-sensitive vision might have spectacularly bright plumage in order to impress a female, but that same plumage might appear dull to predator birds that see only in the violet range.

Feathery findings

The study researchers sequenced the DNA from the 40 species of birds, from the cockatiel to the whitebearded manakin. They extracted DNA from the bases of feather quills, blood, muscle or other tissue. From that DNA, the scientists reconstructed the proteins that make up the light-sensitive pigments in the birds' eyes. Differences in the DNA revealed which birds were sensitive to violet light versus ultraviolet.

"That change is very simple, apparently," Ödeen said. "It just takes a single mutation" in the DNA sequence. While that change may seem insignificant, it can be compared to the difference humans see between red and green.

The researchers mapped the birds' evolutionary relationships using data from their study and others. The color mutation that made bird lineages with violet vision evolve to see in ultraviolet and vice versa occurred at 14 different times in their map, and probably even more among all birds, Ödeen noted.

Why the bird lineages switched their color sensitivity — essentially species of a certain branch on the family tree evolved to have the reverse type of vision — is still something of a mystery. The ability to attract mates while still evading predators could be one reason. Ultraviolet light might also provide higher contrast that makes finding food easier. Other factors are environmental — open spaces have more UV light than do forests, for example. Ultimately, the color sensitivity may be a result of other changes that affect the amount of ultraviolet light the birds' eyes receive.

It seems the evolution of color vision in birds is much less black and white than was once thought.



Check out the story online (including a quiz) here - http://www.livescience.com/26994-how-birds-uv-vision.html

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #27 on: June 18, 2013, 13:04 »
"Noah and the Bunnies" - A great story about a homing pigeon/rock dove at a rehab centre...  8)

http://www.wildroserescueranch.com/noahandthebunnies.html

Offline irenekl

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #28 on: June 19, 2013, 00:59 »
Such a sweet story kinderchick, I love that!!

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: About Birds
« Reply #29 on: July 30, 2013, 13:20 »
this is a bit longer than most our news stories but well worth the read ...

Operation Easter: the hunt for illegal egg collectors
by Julian Rubinstein
The New Yorker / July 22, 2013


http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2013/07/22/130722fa_fact_rubinstein?currentPage=all