Author Topic: Names for the Chicks  (Read 4098 times)

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Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Names for the Chicks
« on: July 19, 2013, 13:51 »
We have three females here in 2013 and in honour of Jules' 5th year as the resident (and only) female in West Winnipeg, we decided that her daughters this year should continue with the naming convention that gave Jules her name ....

Jules doesn't have USFWS/CWS leg bands, rather she has one small breeder's (or Hess) band on her right leg.  Its a small band, not much bigger than a washer which makes sense, a bird raised in captivity doesn't need a large band for identification purposes.  That is also one of the problems with these types of bands, they are very very difficult to read the number on them unless you have them in your hands, which is not something that happens often, if at all, with peregrines in the wild.  So without information on her past or point of origin, we decided to name her and thinking that her band looks like a ring (as in diamond ring) that gave us a starting point for a name.  Not being a big fan of cute names, diamond, ruby, etc didn't appeal and neither did Jewel but a play on the spelling and Jules had her name.  She's a gem alright, an excellent peregrine but mad as a hatter and mean as a viper when you get near her kids.  As I said, an excellent peregrine.

So, this year, in the hopes that her daughters will carry on her excellent tradition (as their brother Annie is doing in Fargo this year!) we are naming these three young ladies after three other excellent jewels ... and ones that have travelled far over a long period of time, also something we wish for all our peregrines!

Andamooka - after the Andamooka Opal that is in the personal collection of HRH Queen Elizabeth II
The South Australian government wanted to present their new Queen with a stone their region was known for, the opal, and set about finding the best example around. The chosen gem came from the Andamooka Opal Fields and had been found in 1949. Known simply as the Andamooka Opal, it is thought to be the finest opal ever discovered there and is praised both for the intensity of its colours and for its overall size.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Mngp7fexbxI/UTky0FLbDpI/AAAAAAAAVKs/uNJdLQwMUiw/s1600/AndamookaOpalQueenElizabeth.jpg - photo 1
http://www.kingopal.com.au/images/andamooka_opal.jpg - photo 2
http://queensjewelvault.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/the-andamooka-opal-necklace-and-earrings.html
http://andamooka.sa.au/andamooka-history - about Andamooka the place

La Peregrina - after the La Peregrina Pearl which was owned by another Elizabeth, Elizabeth Taylor
La Peregrina is one of the most famous pearls in the world (and not to be confused with the La Pelegrina Pearl). Its history spans almost 500 years, and it has passed from the African slave who found it at Pearl Islands in the Gulf of Panama, to European kings and queens. Most recently, the pearl belonged to Elizabeth Taylor.  No real surprise but La Peregrina is a Spanish word that means "the Pilgrim" or "the Wanderer". At the time of its discovery, it was the largest pearl ever found. In 1913 the pearl had to be drilled and cleaned to secure it firmly to its setting. La Peregrina remains one of the largest perfectly symmetrical pear-shaped pearls in the world

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-iMhwUCDAkh0/TuCTtaGV_CI/AAAAAAAAAsE/M2d6z96HYng/s1600/Taylor%2527s+La+Peregrina+Pearl.jpg - whole necklace
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Peregrina_pearl
http://www.internetstones.com/la-peregrina-pearl-elizabeth-taylor-napoleon-iii-philip-ii-queen-mary-i.html
http://www.gemselect.com/other-info/la-peregrina-pearl.php
http://www.deleusejewelers.com/janet-deleuse-newsletter/la-peregrina-pearl/ - interesting historical photos
http://www.christies.com/lotfinder/jewelry/la-peregrina-a-natural-pearl-diamond-5507887-details.aspx - neat page, the Christie's Auction House lot notes & you can zoom in on parts of the necklace

Koh-i-Noor - after the famous, cursed diamond in the crown of Elizabeth, the Queen Mother
The legendary Koh-i-Noor (‘Mountain of Light’) diamond, presented to Queen Victoria in 1850, is now set in the platinum crown made for the late Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother for the 1937 coronation. This diamond, which came from the Treasury at Lahore in the Punjab, may have belonged to the early Mughal emperors before passing eventually to Duleep Singh. It was re-cut for Queen Victoria in 1852 and now weighs 106 carats. Traditionally the Koh-i-Nur is only worn by a queen or queen consort: it is said to bring bad luck to any man who wears it.

http://knowindia.yolasite.com/resources/Koh-I-Noor%206.jpg - photo
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koh-i-Noor
http://www.royal.gov.uk/the%20royal%20collection%20and%20other%20collections/thecrownjewels/overview.aspx
http://famousdiamonds.tripod.com/koh-i-noordiamond.html - a long, very detailed history of the diamond


Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: West Winnipeg - 2013 Chick Names
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2013, 13:58 »
Andamooka = red tape on silver band

La Peregrina = green tape on silver band

Koh-i-Noor = no tape on silver band

Offline MayShowers

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Re: West Winnipeg - 2013 Chick Names
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2013, 14:58 »
How you come up with the most unique names Tracy is beyond my understanding, but these are really great names!

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: West Winnipeg - 2013 Chick Names
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2013, 15:05 »
How you come up with the most unique names Tracy is beyond my understanding, but these are really great names!

Sometimes you just have to let it percolate, sometimes they pop into your head right away, some I have no idea where the ideas come from and others come from way out in left field and are perfect.  These ones were percolates I think ...

Offline Doreen

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Re: West Winnipeg - 2013 Chick Names
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2013, 15:09 »
Great names Tracy! The jewels are very beautiful, just like the 3 chicks.  :D

Offline susha

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Re: West Winnipeg - 2013 Chick Names
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2013, 18:28 »
Wow - brilliant names.  Of course I'll never be able to remember them ::)

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: West Winnipeg - 2013 Chick Names
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2013, 20:49 »
Sometimes you just have to let it percolate, sometimes they pop into your head right away, some I have no idea where the ideas come from and others come from way out in left field and are perfect.  These ones were percolates I think ...

Wow! Absolutely perfect "percolates", TPC, in this year of Queen Elizabeth's Diamond Jubilee! I love them! 8)

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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West Winnipeg - 2014 - Names for the Chicks
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2014, 12:41 »
Okay, have names for these chicks and just in time because these guys are quickedly mobile!

Major theme - the letter "B" - with Beatrix & Beau as their parents, we had to commemorate the year with birds with B names
Minor themes - plays on the meanings of names and the 100th centenary of WW1

male (no tape) - Bishop - after Billy Bishop, WW1 Canadian ace
male (blue tape) - Beaumont - from the battle of Beaumont Hamel and a nod to Beau's name
female (red tape) - Bristol - the name of a type of WW1 biplane
female (yellow tape) - Belle - nod to Beau's name

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2014, 12:43 »
 
Bishop - for William "Billy" Avery Bishop

Air Marshal William Avery "Billy" Bishop, VC, CB, DSO & Bar, MC, DFC, ED, LL.D. (8 February 1894 – 11 September 1956) was a Canadian First World War flying ace, officially credited with 72 victories, making him the top Canadian ace of the war. During the Second World War, Bishop was instrumental in setting up and promoting the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.


Source:  Wikipedia = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Bishop

Fuller biography = http://www.constable.ca/caah/bbishop.htm

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2014, 13:16 »
  
Beaumont - for the assault on Beaumont-Hamel during the Battle of the Somme

Beaumont-Hamel is a commune in the Somme department in Picardy in northern France.  During the First World War, Beaumont-Hamel was very close to the front lines of the conflict and saw heavy combat, especially during the Battle of the Somme which was the largest Allied offensive of the entire war. By 1918 the village was almost totally destroyed.

The Beaumont-Hamel Newfoundland Memorial is a memorial site in France dedicated to the commemoration of Dominion of Newfoundland forces members who were killed during World War I. The 74-acre (300,000 m2) preserved battlefield park encompasses the grounds over which the Newfoundland Regiment made their unsuccessful attack on 1 July 1916 during the first day of the Battle of the Somme.

The Battle of the Somme was the regiment's first major engagement, and during an assault that lasted approximately 30 minutes the regiment was all but wiped out. Purchased in 1921 by the people of Newfoundland, the memorial site is the largest battalion memorial on the Western Front, and the largest area of the Somme battlefield that has been preserved. Along with preserved trench lines, there are a number of memorials and cemeteries contained within the site.

Officially opened by British Field Marshal Earl Haig in 1925, the memorial site is one of only two National Historic Sites of Canada located outside of Canada. (The other is the Canadian National Vimy Memorial). The memorial site and experience of the Newfoundland Regiment at Beaumont-Hamel has come to represent the Newfoundland First World War experience. As a result, it has become a Newfoundland symbol of sacrifice and a source of identity.

Sources:  

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2014, 13:43 »
 
Bristol - for the Bristol Bi-plane, a plane used by Canadian WW1 pilots

The Bristol F.2 Fighter was a British two-seat biplane fighter and reconnaissance aircraft of the First World War flown by the Royal Flying Corps. It is often simply called the Bristol Fighter or popularly the "Brisfit" or "Biff". Despite being a two-seater, the F.2B proved to be an agile aircraft that was able to hold its own against opposing single-seat fighters. The Bristol's solid design ensured that it remained in military service into the 1930s, and surplus aircraft were popular in civil aviation.

In September and October 1917, orders for 1,600 Bristols were placed and by the end of the First World War, the Royal Air Force had 1,583 in operation. A total of 5,329 aircraft were eventually built, mostly by Bristol but also by Standard Motors, Armstrong Whitworth and even the Cunard Steamship Company. After the war, Bristols continued to operate, serving with the New Zealand Permanent Air Force and RAAF as well as with the air forces of Belgium, Canada, Ireland, Greece, Mexico, Norway, Peru, Spain and Sweden. It was not until 1932 that the F.2B was finally withdrawn from RAF service, the last Bristol unit being No. 20 Squadron RAF stationed in India. The type lasted a further three years in New Zealand service.

Andrew Edward McKeever DSO, MC & Bar, DFC (21 August 1894 – 25 December 1919) was a Canadian World War I two-seater flying ace who, in conjunction with his gunners, was credited with 31 victories. He was the highest scoring two seater fighter pilot in the Royal Flying Corps or Royal Air Force.  He scored all 31 of his victories while flying the Britol fighter.  Seven different gunners/observers shared his victories. One of these, Lieutenant Leslie Powell, became an ace in his own right, with 19 successes, 18 of which were in tandem with McKeever.

There are three airworthy Bristol Fighters (as of 2007) one of which (identity # D-7889) is at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum, in Rockcliffe, Ontario

Source: Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_F.2_Fighter

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2014, 14:07 »
 
Belle - there are two nods here, one in honour of an excellent WW1 mother and a nod to her father's name

Verdun Belle was a dog who during WW1 attached herself to a young US Marine in the trenches of France.  It is a nice story, perhaps not entirely true as stories during wartime can sometimes be revised just a bit.  Having said that, perhaps not as this story from the Stars & Stripes isn't all warm & fuzzy.  If you want to read it, the best link I can find is here OR just google "Verdun Belle" and sort through the eBay and Amazon entries.

Offline irenekl

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2014, 15:31 »
Love the "B" theme, good name choices too!

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2014, 22:32 »
...Verdun Belle was a dog who during WW1 attached herself to a young US Marine in the trenches of France... 

A lovely story about a faithful dog. This chick, "Belle" should be very proud of her namesake. 8)

Offline Saoirse

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2014, 16:56 »
Great names, TPC -- and, as always, I especially like the reasoning behind the names.