Author Topic: News: Songbirds, Swifts & Hummingbirds  (Read 5597 times)

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Offline irenekl

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Re: News: Songbirds, Swifts & Hummingbirds / 2012
« Reply #30 on: October 09, 2012, 11:02 »
Two fantastic stories.  I just love those!  Beats all those documentaries of animals in the wild violently killing eachother for some dinner. ;)

Offline dodobird

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Re: News: Songbirds, Swifts & Hummingbirds / 2012
« Reply #31 on: October 09, 2012, 12:01 »
Two beautiful stories!  Thank you!

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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News: Songbirds, Swifts & Hummingbirds / 2013
« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2013, 12:05 »
Ruling on Toronto Cadillac Fairview building's bird window deaths expected Monday
Toronto Metro News - 10 Feb 2013



Thud after dull thud, the birds crashed into the twinkling glass panes of the north Toronto office buildings, falling dead or crippled to the pavement.

More than 800 migrating birds met this fate between March and November 2010, argued EcoJustice lawyer Albert Koehl in a 10-day trial last April against Cadillac Fairview, the owners of the Yonge Corporate Centre at 4100, 4110 and 4120 Yonge St, near York Mills.

The reflective panes of glass mirror the trees and the sky, creating a “fatal illusion” that makes the birds think they have a clear flight path.

Cadillac Fairview faces three charges under the federal Species at Risk Act, the Environmental Protection Act and the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act. The company pleaded not guilty.

A potentially precedent-setting judgment in the case is expected Monday from Ontario Judge Melvyn Green.

If there is a conviction, it means that companies can be held liable for killing birds through window strikes, says Koehl.

“There haven’t been any cases to that effect ever,” he added.

Ecojustice lost a similar lawsuit — the first of its kind in North America — in November.

While Justice of the Peace William Turtle agreed that the birds were dying at Menkes Development’s Consilium Place in Scarborough, long determined by FLAP as the deadliest building complex for birds in Toronto, he ruled that Menkes was making no active effort to harm the birds. The decision has been appealed.

“From an environmental standpoint (the upcoming decision) is crucial, quite frankly,” says Michael Mesure, executive director of the Fatal Light Awareness Program, a Toronto non-profit that educates the public about birds colliding with windows.

Even if the judge acquits Cadillac Fairview, he could still find that emitting reflective light is something that should be regulated under the Environmental Protection Act, like discharging odours or vibrations, Koehl said.

Should Cadillac Fairview be found liable, they could face hefty fines. The maximum fine under the Environmental Protection Act is $6 million per day and that OSPCA Act maximum fine is $60,000.

Despite losing the Menkes case, “we won the war,” says Mesure. Both Consilium Place (now owned by Kevric Real Estate Corporation) and the Yonge Corporate Centre have put up visual markers that warn the birds and collisions have decreased significantly, he says.

The bird film applied last summer to the Yonge Corporate Centre may have the potential to reduce bird strikes by up to 80 per cent, according to a Cadillac Fairview spokesperson.

The City of Toronto requires any building built after January 2010 to include measures to reduce bird strikes.


To see the story online - http://metronews.ca/news/toronto/544338/ruling-on-toronto-cadillac-fairview-buildings-bird-window-deaths-expected-monday/

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Songbirds, Swifts & Hummingbirds / 2013
« Reply #33 on: February 11, 2013, 12:48 »
Update ...

Building’s owner not liable for bird deaths, court rules
Alyshah Hasham, Toronto Star - 11 Feb 2013


The owner of a North Toronto office complex once deemed “lethal” for migrating birds will not be held liable, Ontario Court Justice Melvyn Green ruled Monday morning.

Green agreed that several hundreds of migrating birds have been killed or injured after crashing into the mirror-like windows at Cadillac Fairview’s Yonge Corporate Centre.

However, he ruled that the company did exercise “due diligence” in tackling the “untimely deaths” of birds crashing into their windows.

Despite the decision, Ecojustice lawyer Albert Koehl says the ruling in the landmark case heard last April sets the precedent they have been hoping for, opening the door for the prosecution of other companies who are not addressing the safety of migratory birds.

Under the provincial Environmental Protection Act, Cadillac Fairview was deemed responsible for “discharging a contaminant” in the form of light radiation from the reflective windows.

The birds are lured to their deaths by the illusion of a clear flight path created by the reflection of the sky and trees.

Cadillac Fairview was charged under the Environmental Protection Act and the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act.

It also faced a charge under the federal Species at Risk Act related to the death of several Canada warblers and one olive-sided flycatcher, both threatened species under the act.

Only the EPA and the SARA charges were deemed valid by Green.

The company was acquitted of all charges – avoiding potentially hefty fines – because it met the requirement for due diligence.

Since the case launched, Cadillac Fairview has taken measures to make the Yonge Corporate Centre safer for the birds attracted by the wooded ravine and golf course nearby.

An innovative window film applied to part of the office complex last year has saved hundreds of birds, according to the Fatal Light Awareness Program, a Toronto non-profit organization.

A similar retrofit has been applied at a building involved in a previous lawsuit by Ecojustice against Consilium Place in Scarborough.

That lawsuit ended in defeat for Ecojustice when the court ruled that while the building had caused fatal avian collisions, the owners of the building were not actively trying to harm the birds.

Ecojustice is appealing that decision.

The City of Toronto requires all buildings constructed after 2010 to include measures to reduce bird strikes.


Story online here - http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/02/11/buildings_owner_not_liable_for_bird_deaths_court_rules.html

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Songbirds, Swifts & Hummingbirds
« Reply #34 on: January 27, 2014, 00:31 »
Pope's peace doves attacked by crow and seagull
Associated Press / 26 January 2014   

Fate of white doves unclear after being released by children standing alongside pontiff in front of crowd in St Peter's Square

Two white doves that were released as a peace gesture by children standing alongside Pope Francis were attacked by other birds.  As tens of thousands of people watched in St Peter's Square on Sunday, a seagull and a large black crow swept down on the doves after they were set free from an open window of the Apostolic Palace.  One dove lost some feathers as it broke free from the gull. But the crow pecked repeatedly at the other dove. It was not clear what happened to the doves as they flew off.

Speaking at the window beforehand, Francis appealed for peace in Ukraine, where anti-government protesters have died.



link to source (with photos): http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/26/pope-doves-attacked-by-crow-seagull-st-peters-square

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Songbirds, Swifts & Hummingbirds
« Reply #35 on: May 28, 2014, 22:38 »
This from a birders e-loop I listen in on ... made me smile ...

Hi guys today Amélie from Beaverhill Bird Observatory, Alberta retrap one of our birds.. Yes we say our bird, because we band it...it's not your birds, no way...but I guess she is super happy.(we are too, of course)

A least Flycatcher who flew 4100+km (2547 miles) from may 5 2013 Minatitlan, southern Veracruz State to may 28, 2014. Alberta, in the middle of nowhere..

A wonderful link between México and Canada...

Please don't close your nets, we are sending more birds, yesterday an alder Flycatcher and the last very late Gray Catbird... an we are ready to receive yours for the next fall...



... bird banders are such happy odd creatures when one of "theirs" turns up ... even in the middle of nowhere ....  ;D

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Songbirds, Swifts & Hummingbirds
« Reply #36 on: April 13, 2015, 10:31 »
Birds in the Maritimes are starving, unable to find food in deep snow
TWN News / Katie Jones reporting

Saturday, April 11, 2015, 3:36 PM -   Maritime residents are being asked to come to the aid of starving birds across the region in the midst of persisting cold temperatures and heavy snow.

Piles of snow left behind by months of wintry storms still cover much of the ground across the Maritime provinces, preventing birds from foraging for food.

The issue has become a growing concern as it coincides with the beginning of spring. A lack of proper food sources is taking the greatest toll on migratory birds that have recently returned from the south.

The delayed start to the spring season is hindering birds from getting to the bugs, worms and seeds that they typically feast on at this time of year.



Read the rest of the story and view videos & photos at TWN News - Birds in the Maritimes are starving unable to find food in deep snow

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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News: Passerines
« Reply #37 on: May 09, 2015, 13:47 »
Hummingbird found in flower bouquet in Victoria set free
May 9, 2015 / Cindy E. Harnett / Times Colonist



A rehabilitated baby hummingbird that survived being stored in a fridge, wrapped in an Easter bouquet and carted four hours in a Victoria-bound refrigerated van was set free Friday.  The SPCA’s Wild Animal Rehabilitation Centre in Metchosin sent the seven-week old hummingbird, patient No. 15-202, buzzing away after more than a month of care.

“It was a fascinating story and quite a journey for this little bird,” said Wild ARC manager Kari Marks. “He lived through the initial ordeal, coming down here from Courtenay, and has done well since.”

While other Victorians were finding hidden eggs during the Easter holiday last month, Nancy Packard found a live hummingbird in an Easter bouquet of roses, lilies and chrysanthemums from Courtenay Fifth Street Florist.  Packard heard buzzing coming from her bouquet and thought a bee might be trapped inside. She carefully peeled back the cellophane to find the bird with its feet stuck to the tape on the packaging.  Packard’s son untangled the bird’s tiny feet, but it wouldn’t fly away. It just kept peeping and chirping, even more as it warmed up.

When the bird was unable to draw liquid from a feeder, Packard put it in a box and drove it to Wild ARC.  Staff immediately recognized the bird as a fledgling Anna’s hummingbird, common on Vancouver Island.  The bird was not feeding because it was only weeks old, Marks said. 
The bird was fed with a small syringe. Three days later, it was feeding itself and soon didn’t want human contact or attention, which is normal, said senior wildlife rehabilitator Christina Carrieres.  The hummingbird flew away Friday, weighing 4.5 grams.

Fifth Street Florist owner Steven Meier said a tiny bird’s nest was discovered underneath the shop’s salal greenery, which is added to the flower arrangements.  Meier said the “miracle” bird could have been in the salal stored in the flower shop’s back cooler for days.  Marks said the cold storage might have helped the hummingbird by slowing down its usually fast metabolism. Wild ARC treats about 80 hummingbirds a year, most the victims of cats, said Carrieres. But patient No. 15-202 was special.

“He flew straight up and strongly so,” Marks said of releasing the hummingbird. “He was a very spunky little bird.”



source:  http://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/hummingbird-found-in-flower-bouquet-in-victoria-set-free-1.1929604

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: Passerines
« Reply #38 on: May 09, 2015, 23:35 »
Now that was a very interesting read! Thanks for posting, TPC. :)

Offline GCG

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Re: News: Passerines
« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2015, 03:36 »
A very happy ending. Thank you for sharing!  :)

Offline burdi

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Re: News: Passerines
« Reply #40 on: May 12, 2015, 19:51 »
Very interesting story.

I wish this little bird a happy life.

Offline GCG

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Hummingbirds from EAGLEJIM
« Reply #41 on: August 31, 2015, 05:24 »
This newsletter was sent by Eaglejim (Dayton Ohio) No recent sightings of Cindy and Jim, the resident eagles of Dayton, so he wrote about flight and the Wright Brothers. As another Daytonian living here in Winnipeg, I am proud to share.

https://eastwoodeaglewatchers.wordpress.com/2015/08/31/the-wonders-of-flight/#comments

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: Hummingbirds from EAGLEJIM
« Reply #42 on: August 31, 2015, 22:14 »
Lovely blog & hummer photos! Thanks for sharing, gemcity. :)

Offline Jazzerkins

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Re: News: Songbirds, Swifts & Hummingbirds
« Reply #43 on: September 24, 2015, 13:14 »

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: Songbirds, Swifts & Hummingbirds
« Reply #44 on: September 25, 2015, 22:13 »
Thanks for sharing this link, Jazz.  :)