Author Topic: Names for the Chicks  (Read 1900 times)

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Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Names for the Chicks
« on: July 18, 2014, 09:56 »
We have four chicks at this site - 2 males and 2 females.

Wasn't sure what I was going to do about names for these four, thought I had pretty much exhausted names from WWI in a sense and then I came across these and it seemed like fate.

The Logan chicks have been named after WWI medals - 3 campaign medals that are always together and then one Gallantry or Meritorious Service medal.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2014, 09:58 »
First a little history on Campaign Medals ...

There were five campaign medals available for individuals who saw service in the First World War. An individual, male or female, could be issued with a maximum of three of these medals, although there are a small number of exceptions to the rule.

Service medals were issued automatically to other ranks, but officers or their next of kin had to apply for them. Medals were impressed with the name of the recipient and usually included some or all of the following: service number, rank, first name or initial, surname and military unit (Regiment or Corps). This was either on the rim of the medal or in the case of a star, on the reverse.

In addition to the five campaign medals a badge was available to officers and men who had been honourably discharged or had retired as a result of sickness or wounds from war service.

British Campaign Medal Sets
  • The 1914 Star
  • The 1914-15 Star
  • The British War Medal, 1914-18
  • The Allied Victory Medal
  • The Territorial Force War Medal, 1914-1919
  • The Silver War Badge
  • Mercantile Marine War Medal

Source: The Great War 1914-1918

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2014, 10:01 »
Pip, Squeak and Wilfred

Pip, Squeak and Wilfred are the affectionate names given to the three WW1 campaign medals — The 1914 Star or 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal respectively. These medals were primarily awarded to the Old Contemptibles (B.E.F.). and by convention all three medals are worn together and in the same order from left to right when viewed from the front. The set of three medals or at least the British War Medal and the Victory Medal are the most likely medals to be found among family heirlooms.

   

When the WW1 medals were issued in the 1920's it coincided with a popular comic strip published by the Daily Mirror newspaper. It was written by Bertram J. Lamb (Uncle Dick), and drawn by the cartoonist Austin Bowen Payne (A.B. Payne). Pip was the dog, Squeak the penguin and Wilfred the young rabbit. It is believed that A. B. Payne's batman during the war had been nicknamed “Pip-squeak” and this is where the idea for the names of the dog and penguin came from. For some reason the three names of the characters became associated with the three campaign medals being issued at that time to many thousands of returning servicemen, and they stuck.



Source: The Great War 1914-1918

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2014, 10:03 »
And now some history on awards for gallantry or meritorious service in WW1 ...

There are a number of awards which an individual might receive for a conspicuous and gallant act of valour, usually in the presence of the enemy, whilst serving in the British, Dominion and Colonial armed forces during the First World War. Also, there were awards issued for distinguished and meritorious service.

The following WW1 awards are listed below in order of precedence:
  • Victoria Cross (V.C.)
  • Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.)
  • Distinguished Service Cross (D.S.C.)
  • Military Cross (M.C.)
  • Distinguished Flying Cross (D.F.C.)
  • Air Force Cross (A.F.C.)
  • Distinguished Conduct Medal (D.C.M.)
  • Conspicuous Gallantry Medal (C.G.M.)
  • Distinguished Service Medal (D.S.M.)
  • Military Medal (M.M.)
  • Distinguished Flying Medal (D.F.M.)
  • Air Force Medal (A.F.M.)
  • Meritorious Service Medal (M.S.M.)
  • Mentioned in Despatches (M.I.D.)
  • Citation for a Gallantry Award

Source: The Great War 1914-1918 

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2014, 10:04 »
Victoria Cross (V.C.)
(Level 1 Gallantry Award)



This is the highest award for gallantry. It is awarded for an act of outstanding courage or devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy. All ranks were, and still are, eligible when serving with the British and Commonwealth armed forces.

The Royal Warrant for the award of the Victoria Cross has essentially remained the same since the inception of the medal to the present day. It was, and still is, awarded “for most conspicuous bravery, or some daring or pre-eminent act of valour or self-sacrifice, or extreme devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy.”  The Victoria Cross can also be awarded to civilians if they were under military command at the time of the act of bravery.


Origin of the Victoria Cross

The Victoria Cross was instituted on 29th January 1856.

At the time of the Crimean War (1853-1856) the British military - which consisted of the Royal Navy and the Army - did not have a gallantry medal open to all ranks. The idea was put forward to the British House of Commons by a Member of Parliament and ex-Royal Navy man, Captain T Scobell. It was also suggested as an idea by the then Secretary of State, the Duke of Newcastle.

His successor, Lord Panmure, carried on with the correspondence about the new gallantry medal already established with Prince Albert. Queen Victoria was very interested in the medal, especially as it was to be named after her. She preferred the name of “Victoria Cross” to the suggested title of “The Military Order of Victoria”. Victoria involved herself by making suggestions about the design and the metal it could be made of. She was the person who suggested that the design should bear the words “For Valour” instead of the suggested words “For the Brave”. The word “valour” extended a special significance to an act of extra special bravery and courage, which might be considered to be more than an act of “bravery”.

Queen Victoria did not like the original copper cross which was submitted for approval. A suggestion was made to create the medal from the cascabels (the knob and the neck of a breech-loading cannon) of two Russian cannons captured in the Crimea. As has been examined in a recent study(2), the two 18 pounder cannons which were provided for creating the Victoria Cross medals were Chinese in origin, not Russian. One theory is that the guns were captured by the Russians from the Chinese and used against the British Army in the battle at Sevastopol. It has also been suggested that the metal used for the Victoria Crosses cast during the First World War did not come from these two original cannons, but from other Chinese guns captured in the Boxer Rebellion (1898-1901).

The Royal Warrant for the Victoria Cross was issued on 29th January 1856. The first investiture ceremony was held a few months later in Hyde Park on 26th June 1856. 62 awards were issued for acts of valour during the Crimean War (1853-1856).

There is approximately 10kg of remaining metal from the two cascabels of the original cannons reputed to have come from Sevastopol. This is stored in a secure vault and can only be taken out of the vault under an armed guard. The same jewellers, Hancocks of London, has been responsible for casting the Victoria Cross medal from the first one to the present day.

Source: The Great War 1914-1918 

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2014, 10:10 »
So this year's chicks are:

Pip (no tape), Will (red tape), Squeak (green tape - the only green tape in the province)  & Tory (yellow tape).

Some of these names are not necessarily what I would have chosen had had they not been nicknames given to their medals by those who "won" them.  Even then I preferred "Will" to "Wilfred" or "Wilf" and we don't have a Will in our family tree yet so Project's discretion.  Nothing wrong with Victoria, but they are a pretty tight crew and we shorten her mother's name, so Tory it is.  Pip is easiest, he's the smallest and nips but Squeak has a story - she squeaked or more quacked a bit like a duck when we banded her, so that name, though more "fluffy" than is my want, she has affectionately earned!

Offline birdnut

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2014, 10:40 »
Love the name choices - my daughter's name is also Victoria, which her friends have shorten to Tori.


Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2014, 11:36 »
(sorry Birdnut, didn't mean to lock this topic - have moved your post over   :))

Offline susha

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2014, 13:28 »
Love the names!

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: Names for the Chicks
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2014, 16:30 »
So this year's chicks are:
Pip (no tape), Will (red tape), Squeak (green tape - the only green tape in the province)  & Tory (yellow tape)...

Wonderful names! :D

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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2015 Names for the Chicks
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2015, 12:08 »
2015 Names for the Chicks

There were four males at this site, but two died right after fledging.  They fledged earlier than anticipated so we didn't get a chance to name them before they flew.  Then it seemed only appropriate to wait to name all the chicks at the same time.  We had been toying with some names but they just didn't seem to fit, but as soon as the voting on names for the McKenzie Seeds chicks was done, we had the perfect names - Calloway (white tape) and Django (red tape).  The problem with naming these two chicks was that nothing seemed to fit, not names or even themes for names, these two just need names that set them apart from the rest of the crowd and little did we know that the voters by not voting for these two names would be giving the Logan boys names that fit them perfectly.  Django Rheinhardt was a Romany for whom travelling is as much in their blood as it is in the peregrines and Cab Calloway was the longest lived of all of our jazz greats - he died in 1994 at the age of 86 - and we all wish our birds long life!

so thanks to everyone who didn't vote for Calloway & Django for the McKenzie Seeds chicks!  ;D