Author Topic: News: Seabirds  (Read 1202 times)

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Offline The Peregrine Chick

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News: Seabirds
« on: September 10, 2014, 14:17 »
Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as she soars over open seas
The Guardian (UK), 4 Sept 2014

An endangered seabird and one scientists know very little about
Nice article and great photos

Offline irenekl

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2014, 09:08 »
Had never heard of these birds.  Very interesting.

Offline dupre501

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2014, 15:48 »
They lay only one egg per season ??? That makes it harder for the species to recover, as it would take a minimum of two seasons just to maintain the population, plus probably a couple more to take into account juvenile mortality.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2014, 22:27 »
They lay only one egg per season ??? That makes it harder for the species to recover, as it would take a minimum of two seasons just to maintain the population, plus probably a couple more to take into account juvenile mortality.

Not unlike Emperor Penguins and most if not all of the albatrosses ... even raptors, how often is there just one chick in a bald eagle nest.  And while peregrines might have more eggs, with the level of mortality in the first year, the result isn't much better.  Predators always reproduce at a lower rate, though coyotes may be a bit of an exception ...

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2015, 02:45 »
SHE'S BAAAAAACK

HONOLULU, Hawaii - Federal wildlife officials say the world's oldest known seabird has returned to Midway Atoll.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday the Laysan Albatross named Wisdom was spotted at the remote island on Nov. 19


Check out the full story at - https://shar.es/1cGa8O



Offline Alison

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2016, 22:43 »
SHE'S BAAAAAACK

HONOLULU, Hawaii - Federal wildlife officials say the world's oldest known seabird has returned to Midway Atoll.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday the Laysan Albatross named Wisdom was spotted at the remote island on Nov. 19


Check out the full story at - https://shar.es/1cGa8O


Wisdom's chick hatched on February 1, 2016. The chick was given the name "Kukini", a Hawaiian word meaning "messenger".

Wisdom's mate has now also been given a name. He has been named "Akeakamai" (pronounced "Ah Kee Ah Ka Maee"), which means "seeker of wisdom" or "lover of wisdom".

Kukini hatching (left) and Wisdom with Kukini (right):

 

Wisdom is now at least 65 years old, and Kukini is at least her fortieth chick.

What an incredible albatross Wisdom is!

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2016, 23:22 »
Craigleith, Scotland

Found this little guy on one of the Scottish Seabird Centre webcams today:

 

https://seabird.org/wildlife/webcams/craigleith-cliff/12/28/63


Offline Alison

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2016, 15:15 »
Laysan Albatross Wisdom and the man who banded her 60 years ago, Chandler "Chan" Robbins



For two living legends, 2016 is a celebratory year: the 60th anniversary of Wisdom the Laysan Albatross getting her first leg band by Chandler “Chan” Robbins, who turned 98 on July 17.

Robbins worked for 73 years at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland, creating the annual North American Breeding Bird Survey and coauthoring the Golden Guide—Birds of North America—with over 6 million copies sold. Wisdom is the oldest banded bird in the wild. On February 1 she hatched what is estimated to be her 40th chick on her historic home ground at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, located in the farthest reaches of the northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

Wisdom’s spectacular survival record includes having flown the estimated equivalent of six round-trips to the moon (an albatross spends 90 percent of its lifetime in flight); having survived two tsunamis; and, having avoided fishing longlines with baited hooks.

How does Wisdom do it? Robbins, who has made 10 trips to Midway over the past six decades, thinks the elder albatross has learned how to avoid the dangers facing seabirds and has a lot to teach us humans, too.


More at the link:

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/qa-chan-robbins-talks-about-wisdom-the-worlds-oldest-banded-bird/

Two remarkable lives intertwined. May they both have many more years to come.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2016, 15:18 by Alison »

Offline burdi

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2016, 14:32 »
Laysan Albatross Wisdom and the man who banded her 60 years ago, Chandler "Chan" Robbins

Two remarkable lives intertwined. May they both have many more years to come.


Alison, thank you for sharing this wonderful and very touching story about Wisdom and Chan Robbins.


Offline Alison

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2016, 22:35 »
Nigel the Lonely Gannet



On Mana Island, off the coast of New Zealand, a colony of decoy gannets made of concrete was installed 40 years ago in the hope of attracting gannets to nest on the island.

After all these years, a single male gannet arrived on the island last November. He has chosen one of the concrete decoys for his mate, and has even built a nest of dirt and seaweed.

I hope that next year Nigel will be lucky enough to find a real mate.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/cutestuff/84011123/nigel-the-lonely-gannet-finds-love-with-a-concrete-decoy-on-mana-island

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2016, 14:18 »
Wisdom is home!

Laysan Albatross Wisdom has once again returned to Midway, and she is incubating an egg! Her mate, Akeakamai, has also returned.

Their chick from early this year, Kūkini, left Midway in the middle of July to spend the next four or five years at sea.

Photo by Kristina McOmber/Kupu Conservation Leadership Program & USFWS



Many more great photos with the article:

http://usfwspacific.tumblr.com/post/154164722795/wisdom-returns-to-midway-atoll-andshes

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2016, 10:48 »
Tropical booby bird found in St Leonards flown back to the Caribbean in time for Christmas
Siobhan Ryan / The Argus / 18 Dec 2016



A TROPICAL bird found washed up on a Sussex beach has been flown 5,000 miles back home in time for Christmas.

The red-footed booby bird was discovered underweight and dehydrated in St Leonards in September by volunteers from East Sussex Wildlife Rescue and Ambulance Service.

The bird, nicknamed Norman, underwent intensive care at the RSPCA's Mallydams Wood in Hastings, where he spent time under a heat lamp to ward off the cold and ate sprats to build up his strength.

Mystery surrounds how the young bird managed to be blown off course and end up on the beach.

He is now settling in at a nature reserve in the Cayman Islands in the Caribbean following a 12 hour British Airways flight.

Mallydams wildlife rehabilitation team manager Richard Thompson said: "It is just fantastic to see Norman make his way home after the team here have worked so hard nursing him back to health and full strength.

"We are used to dealing with native seabirds here - like gulls and terns - but he is the first booby bird we have ever seen here at the RSPCA and the UK.

"It is amazing to think we've had a hand in his care."

RSPCA wildlife vet Barbara Watson flew alongside Norman to keep an eye on his progress and carry out vet checks before and after the flight.

She said: "I never imagined in my career I would be asked to treat a booby bird as they have never been seen over here before. It is incredible to think how he got to the south coast of England."



source: http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/14973657.Tropical_booby_bird_found_in_Sussex_flown_home_in_time_for_Christmas/

Offline Kinderchick

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2016, 15:18 »
Very interesting!

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2017, 12:52 »
Wisdom is back!



The world's oldest known and most famous wild bird has returned to Midway!

Now at least 67 years old, Wisdom is once again incubating an egg. She is incredible!

It is very sad that during the past year we lost Chandler Robbins, who banded Wisdom way back in the 1950s, and continued to watch over her for decades.

I hope incubation will go smoothly for Wisdom and her mate Akeakamai.

The photo below, from May 2017, shows Wisdom's chick from earlier this year. I don't know if the chick was named, but he/she was banded AB87.



More information and photos of Wisdom at the link below:

http://usfwspacific.tumblr.com/post/168787067605/wisdom-the-oldest-known-albatross-returns-to
« Last Edit: December 23, 2017, 13:12 by Alison »

Offline burdi

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Re: News: Seabirds
« Reply #14 on: December 26, 2017, 23:14 »
Forbidden island

Located off the B.C. coast, Triangle Island is crucial to the planet's seabirds — and off limits to humans

To the northwest of Vancouver Island, long past the giant cedars and rainforests and on the precipice of the continental shelf, lies one of the most remote and vulnerable places in Canada.

Hard to find on any map, it’s actually one of the most densely populated places on the B.C. coast — if you happen to be a seabird.

Triangle Island, which is 45 kilometres from the northern tip of Vancouver Island and named for its roughly geometric shape, is home to about two million birds that fly in every spring and summer to breed.

It’s also one of the most sensitive ecosystems in North America, and a place where any kind of human presence is tightly controlled. The number of people allowed to visit in any given year is usually fewer than a dozen.


See the rest here: http://www.cbc.ca/news2/interactives/sh/lBuyhpcqVr/forbidden-island/