Author Topic: WI / Ashland - Oredock - 2009  (Read 766 times)

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Offline Alison

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WI / Ashland - Oredock - 2009
« on: August 04, 2009, 19:39 »
In Ashland, Wisconsin, peregrines nested on a very old oredock, unused for many years, which was due to be demolished. Demolition was delayed to accommodate the falcons, who raised three chicks.  One of the chicks has now fledged, and ended up on the ground. He/she was unable to gain any height, and was therefore rescued and returned to the nest.  I wonder where the pair who have called this nest home will nest next year.

http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/sports/outdoors/460681

Photos by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. What a beautiful juvie.

 


Offline Alison

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Re: Ashland Oredock - 2009 / ? & ?
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2009, 19:07 »
It seems the juvies may have moved away from the nest site. It's good to know that people have been supportive of them.

The falcon chicks may have finally flown the nest at the historic ore dock in Ashland.  DNR wildlife biologist Todd Naas says the peregrine falcon chicks may have finally left. Their last documented appearance was last Friday. Naas says all the chicks, including the male chick that had trouble flying, put on an aerobatic show.

“They’re basically swooping and diving and attacking each other and practicing rolling over in the air and about everything you can imagine.”  Naas says that if the chicks really have left, they will be missed. He says the community was very interested in their well-being. “Every day people would stop down there wanting to know how they were doing and basically checking up on them. I think a lot of people had some sense of ownership over them because they’d come down and check on them regularly and were very concerned about them.”

Naas says the parents haven’t been sighted either and that it’s likely they’re with the chicks. The chicks usually don’t leave their parents for five to six weeks.


source: http://www.businessnorth.com/kuws.asp?RID=3034