Author Topic: News: Peregrines  (Read 43195 times)

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Offline carly

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News: Peregrines
« on: April 24, 2009, 08:33 »
Elizabetha Sets a New World Record

Autumn 2008

Elizabetha, an adult female peregrine that we tagged in Chile on 21 January 2008 as part of the Southern Cross Peregrine Project, migrated north to Baffin Island, Canada, to breed last summer. After raising her family, she began to migrate south again on 22 September, generally following the classic US east coast route. On 19 October, she was flying off the coast of New Jersey when she apparently caught the counter-clockwise storm system of Hurricane Omar. With solid tail winds, she flew south all the way to Palm Beach, Florida in a day, a distance of at least 954 miles and a knock-out world record. None of us had even dreamed that a peregrine could fly that far in a single day. This is yet another example of how satellite transmitters are revolutionizing our understanding of so many organisms worldwide.

As I write this bulletin (28 December), she is still migrating slowly south, having just arrived in Chile once again. She is demonstrating that some adult females perform an unanticipated “slow migration” south, long suspected but now confirmed for the species.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2012, 16:51 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline carly

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Re: News: Peregrines / 2009
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2009, 16:32 »
Old Age Peregrines Hatch Miracle Chick

video = http://www.youtube.com/v/LGFLjNUEPl4&rel=0&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=3"

RANDY old birds of prey have successfully hatched a falcon chick almost a decade after they normally stop breeding.
The peregrine chick was born in the early hours of Monday morning after the mother and father – both in their mid twenties – had clutch of eggs.  Peregrine falcons rarely live to beyond 20 years old and it is unusual for them to breed after 17.

Animal workers were amazed the OAPs – Old Aged Peregrines – had bred for the first time in five years but assumed the eggs would be infertile. However they were left stunned when they heard the sound of cheeping coming from one of the clutch.  And to their amazement – and delight – a single chick hatched and is said to be “bold, healthy and happy”.



Now staff at Elite Falconry in Fife plan to rear the baby bird of prey on minced quail before returning it to its parents later this week. Barry Blyther, head falconer at the sanctuary near Kirkcaldy, said he was delighted about the eggs but more amazed when one hatched.

He said: “The birds lay a clutch of three eggs and we thought the eggs would be infertile. We were just pleased that they had produced eggs at all but after 10 or 12 days one of the eggs disappeared and we decided to take them in and incubate them. We started to suspect that one egg was fertile and on Sunday we heard one of the eggs cheeping and it turned out the chick had started the hatching process.  It hatched out sometime in the early hours of Monday. It is a strong, bold, healthy and happy chick and we are absolutely delighted.”



Barry said staff had given up hope of the pair breeding again after they had gone five years without mating.

He said: “A good age for a peregrine falcon is 17 or 18 years old and to have them still breeding at that age is doing really well. These ones are in their mid-twenties and although we have kept them in good condition the idea that they could produce eggs had passed from our minds, it was a real surprise from us.”

Barry is currently feeding the chick tiny amounts of minced quail but plans to return the chick to its rightful place as soon as possible.

“We want the chick to be parent reared but we will keep feeding it by hand until it is about four or five days old when we will return it to its parents. We don’t know what sex it is yet but by the time it is six or seven weeks old we should be able to tell by the size of the bird.”

Peregrine falcons are a protected species in the UK, with just 1,250 breeding pairs although numbers have increased since the 1970s and ‘80s when the bird was seriously endangered.


http://deadlinescotland.wordpress.com/2009/05/04/old-age-peregrines-hatch-miracle-chick-939/
« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 18:48 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline kittenface

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Re: News: Peregrines / 2009
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2009, 13:30 »
Peregrine Falcon, “James,” Shatters Record for Lifetime Reproductive Success

Like many bird species, peregrine falcons have high mortality in the first year, followed by lower mortality in subsequent years.  Median life expectancy of birds that reach their second year of life, is still only between 4 and 5 years.  Only 3% are expected to live beyond 10 years.  The grand old male peregrine falcon, nicknamed “James” by the public, is still breeding on the James River Bridge at the ripe old age of 19 years old.  He is now approaching a longevity record for peregrine falcons in the wild, believed to be 19 years, 3 months.

James was hatched in 1990 on the Leg-Mason building (Baltimore, MD).  He was first observed on the James River Bridge in 1992 and first bred there in 1993.  In his tenure on the bridge, he has produced a record 48 chicks to banding age.  Previous lifetime reproductive success across North America for both males and females range between 22 and 25 chicks.  Interestingly, James long time mate nicknamed Virginia was hatched by the same parents on the Leg-Mason building in 1989.  Though they were full siblings, they successfully bred at the site from 1994 through 2006.  Virginia disappeared in 2006 and was replaced by an unbanded female, dubbed Elizabeth the following year.  The story of James continues: on March 9 James and Elizabeth laid their first egg for 2009.


source: http://www.ccb-wm.org/news/2009_JanApr/james_peregrine_nineteen.htm
« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 19:10 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline carly

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News: USA / New York Peregrines
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2009, 12:09 »
20-year-old falcon reappears injured after yearlong absence
The Buffalo News / June 2009

Like the legend of the Phoenix, a peregrine falcon that went missing after nesting for years at the Statler Towers has seemingly risen from the dead. The male bird was found Tuesday crossing a driveway in Amherst.

The 20-year-old male bird, which vanished one year ago, was thought to be dead because he is one of the oldest peregrine falcons ever recorded.

“He just disappeared. Gone without a trace,” said Connie M. Adams, a state Department of Environmental Conservation wildlife biologist. “Instead, we find out that he had been evicted [by another bird].”

The falcon was picked up by Buffalo Animal Control, then passed on to the DEC. Currently, he is at Erie County SPCA headquarters in the Town of Tonawanda, where his health is being evaluated.  Joel Thomas, a wildlife administrator for the SPCA, said the bird has been grounded for a few days. Thomas also said the bird has a severe fracture on his left leg and may also have internal injuries.

“We don’t know if he was knocked out of the sky by his competition, but it definitely comes as a surprise that he is still alive,” Thomas said. “If he wound up dead in the cage tomorrow, I wouldn’t be shocked because he’s in real rough shape, beyond being attacked.”

Thomas said once SPCA officials diagnose the bird, they will decide if the falcon can survive surgery. If surgery is performed, it would take about one month for the bird to recover.  He also said the bird’s days in the wild are over — that he will probably live the rest of his life in an educational or research institution.

The falcon first appeared in downtown Buffalo in 1996 and began nesting at the Statler Tower in 1998. DEC officials estimate he fathered nearly 40 other falcons with three females in his 12 years on the scene.

“It’s truly amazing,” Adams said. “For him to be alive without a nest for this long is testament to how tough a bird he really is. He is a survivor.”


source: http://www.buffalonews.com/cityregion/northernsuburbs/story/698572.html
« Last Edit: January 10, 2011, 20:22 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: USA / New York Peregrines
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2009, 22:33 »
20-year-old falcon reappears injured after yearlong absence - Part 2

Missing Peregrine Falcon found
WIVB TV / June 2009

BUFFALO, N.Y. (WIVB) - A Peregrine Falcon missing from downtown for weeks has been found. Animal control officers discovered the bird alive but injured in Buffalo.

The SPCA traced its band number and discovered it once lived at the Statler Towers. The 19-year old bird has already outlasted the normal lifespan in the wild. If it recovers, it will remain in captivity.


The link below has a very short video:
http://www.wivb.com/dpp/news/local/Missing_Peregrine_Falcon_found_20090610

What a beautiful face:

 

 

From TPC: He looks like Trey (seriously)
« Last Edit: January 10, 2011, 20:29 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: USA / New York Peregrines
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2009, 18:10 »
20-year-old falcon reappears injured after yearlong absence - Part 3

I found an update on Handsome a few minutes ago, and it's good news:

Part of a report by Gina at the SPCA today:

". . . .And on a SECOND falcon note - the story that will be going up on our site tomorrow (or hopefully today, depending on how the day goes!) - the Statler falcon was stabilized enough to undergo surgery yesterday, and so far so good...! He ate very well after surgery, is trying to move around today....things seem great so far, and we're all optimistic. Here are a couple of the post-surgery photos I took yesterday that will be posted."

Photos of Handsome by Gina:

 

Talons crossed for Handsome to make a complete recovery. He is one of the great falcons.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2011, 20:28 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: USA / New York Peregrines
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2009, 15:48 »
20-year-old falcon reappears injured after yearlong absence - Part 4

More very sad news today. Handsome, the long-time tiercel from the Statler building, has lost his battle to recover.  :'(

Sad news, Handsome, the Kiptopeke male who was recently found on a driveway in Amherst badly injured, has lost his fight to live. He survived for over two weeks post-surgery but fell ill and went downhill fast. This wonderful bird was the mate of Beauty at the Statler for many years and they gave us many babies. Beauty died a couple years ago.

I don't know when this happened. I spoke with someone at the Erie County SPCA last Friday and they had two falcons there at that time - Handsome and the Grand Island chick.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2011, 20:28 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines / 2009
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2009, 21:26 »
Peregrine falcon lands in Sutton carpark
Wednesday 8th July 2009



Peregrine park: Fallon the wayward falcon was missing a sat-nav as he crash-landed near hatchbacks in a multi-storey car park

When you are the fastest living creature in the world it is essential to have a trusty guidance mechanism.  This juvenile peregrine falcon, named Fallon, is recovering after taking a wrong turn and crash-landing into a multi-storey car park in Sutton. Staff at Cheam Wildlife Care were amazed to find a member of one of Britain’s most endangered species after being called to the scene. They took Fallon, dazed and confused, to their privately-run sanctuary in Frederick Avenue before handing him to licensed raptor specialists.  

Paul Morin, founder of Cheam Wildlife Care, said: “Soon it will be back in the air terrorising other birds again. It’s not very often we get called out to reports of a kestrel and return with a peregrine falcon. We are aware of several pairs in central and Greater London, where these magnificent birds have found a safe home. It is nice to see a bird of prey occassionally without straps and rings.”

Scientists have claimed that the peregrine, which kills its prey with a single blow, can stoop vertically at up to 186mph. After a population crash in the 1960s, its numbers have recovered steadily, with recent surveys revealing 1,500 peregrine pairs in the UK.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 10:15 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines / 2009
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2009, 19:31 »
Peregrine falcon flies again after Sutton crash landing

Fallon, the wayward peregrine falcon, is flying high again after recovering from minor injuries sustained in a crash-landing. The juvenile bird of prey featured in the Sutton Guardian in July after taking a wrong turn and plummeting into a multi-storey car park. He was rescued by staff at Cheam Wildlife Care, in Frederick Avenue, and put in the care of licensed raptor specialists. Paul Morin, founder of the sanctuary, said Fallon was now ready to terrorise other birds again after being released back into the wild last week.


Link to story: The Guardian - Injured Peregrine Falcon Returns to the High Life


Birds-eye view: Fallon the falcon surveys the skyline before taking flight. Credit: Les Stocker/Tiggywinkles

« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 10:17 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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News: USA / Iowa Peregrines
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2009, 19:51 »
A return to the wild: Rescued falcon set free at Ottumwa Generating Station
Ottumwa Courier / 3 August 2009

CHILLICOTHE — Two women behind the Ottumwa Generating Station were letting a killer go free.

Wildlife rehab specialist Kay Neumann spent more than a month with an immature peregrine falcon that had been rescued by Alliant employees.

“She was mostly dehydrated and hungry,” said Neumann, who specializes in working with birds of prey, or “raptors.”

These birds are instinctive hunters, killing and eating full-grown pigeons or quail. But the last time this peregrine baby was handled by humans, she screamed like she was the one being murdered. And if those assisting with the Ottumwa Generating Station banding program back in June needed a reminder that these birds-of-prey are not pets, one of the chicks slashed part-way through a worker’s thick leather glove. So when they found a drenched, shivering and grounded chick after a storm, the falcon’s actions — or lack of actions — let employees know something was very wrong.

They called Judi Johnson, the Ottumwa Generating Station employee who has taken the lead in watching out for the raptors.

“She let us walk right up to her, pick her up and hold her like a baby,” said Judi Johnson.

The bird was still too young to fly, and the mother peregrine falcon had three other young birds to care for. The best theory now, Johnson said, is that the baby bird might have gotten knocked out of the nesting box, located 300 feet up the face of the Ottumwa Generating Station smokestack.  How could a two pound bird survive a 300 foot fall?

“Well, she may have flown a little bit,” guessed Johnson. “But she wouldn’t have survived the night if we hadn’t found her.”

Neumann agreed, both that the bird was in trouble, and that the immature bird’s wings could have functioned as a type of parachute during the fall. But without being able to fly back to the nest to Mama, and without the ability to hunt, Neumann had to keep the falcon longer than usual at SOAR (Saving Our Avian Resources), the nonprofit organization in Carroll County.

After the bird was in Intensive Care, she was moved to the flight pen, where she began to learn how to fly. The pen also allows birds to practice hunting and gain strength before being released. Neumann said this is the longest she’s ever kept a bird away from its mother and then attempted reintroduction.

“This is a first,” said Johnson before the bird’s arrival. “I hope for success. It’s been over a month. She could be accepted — or she could be rejected.”

But if that was the case, the extra time spent in rehab taught the bird both to fly and to find food.

But it was still a worry to let this “strange” bird loose at OGS. Would the other hunters recognize the long-lost family member? hen the baby was released, she began flying and calling out. At first, the response was not welcoming: An adult peregrine dove down to chase the “newcomer.” But after a tense few minutes, Neumann said, the pair went toward the nest. The adult allowed the bird to enter the box, and then went about its business.

“I was so afraid the mother [falcon] would kill her,” Johnson admitted after the release.

Neumann said the release appeared successful, and believed the returned bird would thrive.


http://www.ottumwa.com/local/local_story_216001320.html?start:int=15
« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 13:20 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Looking for I.D. on falcon seen in Indiana
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2009, 20:23 »
TPC, I wonder if you might be able to help identify a peregrine seen recently in Indiana.

The bands are black/green, S/34 - on the right leg instead of the left. The left leg has a silver band; part of the number seems to be 52. The bird looks like a juvie from this year. He/she is not in the database.

My first guess would be that he/she may be from Ohio, which has used many of the S numbers, including some in the S20s. Or perhaps Wisconsin or Michigan, or even Iowa or Illinois, all of which have used a few S numbers.

Any help would be much appreciated.

Here are photos of the bird:





And I found this photo by chance on Flickr. I am sure this is the same bird. This info was with the photo:

7 Sept 2009 Vigo County
Statemens Towers
The Dark Band on right leg appears to have S on it on other photos. The Green Band below it on right leg appears to have a number 4 or ending in 4 on it. (Jim Sullivan said through a spotting scope it was 34) The Silver Band appears to have 52 on it in this photo.




http://www.flickr.com/photos/67383370@N00/3898272763/



Offline kittenface

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Re: Looking for I.D. on falcon seen in Indiana
« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2009, 11:42 »
Allison have you contacted Donna yet about the Falcon your trying to idenify?

Offline Alison

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Re: Looking for I.D. on falcon seen in Indiana
« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2009, 14:12 »
Allison have you contacted Donna yet about the Falcon your trying to idenify?

Yes, I did. I have received a reply from Dave Scott:

We used Black over Red color bands in 2009.  I checked the Midwest
Raptor Center database (all years) as well as my records for 2007 & 2008
and could not find a B/G = S/34 ... given that the federal band is
silver, I suspect you have an eastern bird.  Perhaps someone from The
Raptor Center in Minnesota can help you contact folks in the eastern US
regarding their banding records for falcons.

Sorry!

Dave Scott


So I will check elsewhere.


Offline kittenface

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Re: Looking for I.D. on falcon seen in Indiana
« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2009, 15:53 »
Oh thats to bad
Well if anyone will figure it out
YOU WILL
If you can think of anything I can do to help out  just let me know I love a good mystery ;D

Offline skygirlblue

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Re: Looking for I.D. on falcon seen in Indiana
« Reply #14 on: September 30, 2009, 21:31 »
Hi Alison...I just checked Greg Septon's banding reports for the Wisconsin nests he monitors (30 + nests)...no bands matching your juvie..great pictures, though!!