Author Topic: News: Peregrines  (Read 43191 times)

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Offline Alison

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News: USA / Florida Peregrines
« Reply #30 on: November 28, 2009, 22:10 »
Rare bird recuperating from life-saving surgery
St Augustine News / 28 Nov 2009


A young peregrine falcon, which are only rarely seen in Florida, is recuperating after major life-saving surgery.  Staff at St. Johns Veterinary Clinic operated Friday on the bird, which was found injured earlier this week in Volusia County.  Dr. Mark Gendzier, a veterinarian, said pins were placed in the radius in its left wing, and the tibiotarsus in the bird's right leg.

"This bird was in quite good shape for having two fractures," he said. However, the healing rate for fractures in birds is lower than in humans and other animals because avian bones are hollow.  There also isn't much blood supply to bones, which is essential for healing.

Peregrine falcons were endangered for years after wide-spread use of DDT lowered its reproduction rate, and they had few nests east of the Mississippi, according to the Audubon Society. Now, peregrine falcons migrate through Florida on their way to habitat in South America.  The bird, resting on its breast Friday afternoon in an incubator set to 90 degrees, is expected to pull through.

Melanie Cain-Stage of H.A.W.K.E., a wildlife rehabilitator, said the bird probably would not recover enough to be released into the wild.

"Eventually, he'll get the wrappings off and some rehab like physical therapy" and would become an education bird, she said.

Stage said the bird was too young to be reliably identified as male or female because its flight feathers had not yet come in.  In males, "wing feathers are slate blue," she said, while females have brown wing feathers.
Note: there are no colour differences between the genders.  Adults are slate-grey, juveniles are brown.  Appartently this was a reporting error  :)

If it's a male, she'll name it Ken after longtime friends Ken Pacetti and Ken Moffitt, she said in an e-mail. Pacetti passed away Monday, she said.  In the meantime, she said she'd make up a sling to protect the bird's foot, and would keep it "clean, calm and fed."  

That entails administering painkillers and antibiotics, Gendzier said. And Stage said she'd use calipers to feed the sharp-beaked bird small pieces of quail three times a day.


http://staugustine.com/news/local-news/2009-11-28/rare-bird-recuperating-life-saving-surgery

Photo from the Humane Association of Wildlife Care and Education.

« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 13:15 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: USA / Florida Peregrines
« Reply #31 on: November 30, 2009, 00:43 »
Rare bird recuperating from life-saving surgery

Melanie at HAWKE reports that their peregrine is doing very well - recovering from surgery and tolerating the associated handling calmly.  Melanie thinks the bird might be a female and she has 30 years of raptor experience including a couple of peregrines - a male and a female.  She also passed along an email from Carol who found the juvie at her home near the beach.  From the description of the bird's injuries & Carol's description of how the bird was found, it is very probable that the youngster was hunting birds near power/phone lines and collided with them.  We have had similar injuries among birds here so its a good guess.  The wing fracture was an open fracture which are notoriously poor to heal well enough, so the little "girl" will become an education bird - young is good in that case, they can "take" to captivity better than older birds.  Peregrines are snotty-by-nature though, so we will have to see.  

Melanie will send us updates as she has time ... I told her that it would be a great favour for y'all as I know you are experiencing peregrine withdrawal these days.  Will forward whatever I should receive!

So big applause and best wishes to Melanie, her vets, volunteers and all the supporters of HAWKE in Florida!

Offline Alison

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Re: News: USA / Florida Peregrines
« Reply #32 on: December 01, 2009, 19:19 »
Rare bird recuperating from life-saving surgery / Injured falcon on road to recovery

ELKTON -- A bird not usually seen in this area that swoops in on its prey faster than a Daytona 500 competitor is recuperating from life-threatening injuries after being found last week in Ormond Beach.

For the first time since its Friday surgery to repair fractures to its left wing and right leg, the peregrine falcon was able to put weight on its broken leg Saturday. The surgeon, Dr. Mark Gendzier of St. Johns Veterinary Clinic, was optimistic.

"It looked very good on his post-op X-rays," said Gendzier, who does pro bono work for wildlife rehabilitators.

The juvenile bird's caretaker, Melanie Cain-Stage of the Humane Association of Wildlife Care and Education (HAWKE Inc.) in this rural town west of St. Augustine, says she's not sure whether the bird is male or female -- and doubts it will be swooping in on prey in the wild again.

"If they aren't perfect, they are going to die" in the wild, she said, explaining that peregrines migrate up to 11,000 miles, with some of them covering the expanse from summer homes in Alaska to wintering grounds in South America.

The juvenile that an Ormond Beach woman reported "falling out of the sky" into her backyard eight days ago was likely migrating to its winter residence, according to Michael Brothers, manager of education and exhibits at the Marine Science Center in Ponce Inlet.

This species, likely of the subspecies peregrinis flaco anatum, generally appears in this area in mid-November as it makes its way to points south, although Brothers said he's seen a number of them roosting in this area all winter, he said.

But they are hardly ever brought in for rehabilitation. Brothers estimates that since the Mary Keller Seabird Rehabilitation Sanctuary opened in 2004, only one or two of the 5,500 birds that have come through the sanctuary have been peregrine falcons. The bird rehab facility is part of the science center.

"It's exciting to see this bird up close," he said.

The Ormond Beach woman who found the bird at first brought the injured animal to the Ponce Inlet facility, Brothers said. But then Cain-Stage, who has a permit to handle peregrine falcons for education, was called on to find the appropriate care for the bird.

Cain-Stage said she believes the bird was probably hit by a car. As it recuperates, Cain-Stage is feeding it beef and quail. Already the bird is getting the hang of its new life in the hospital portion of Cain-Stage's sanctuary, which also houses eagles, otters, turtles and owls. As Cain-Stage approached the bird's incubator with chunks of meat, it stopped making a slight hissing noise and opened its slightly hooked beak.

"Already she knows I'm not going to hurt her," Cain-Stage said. "And that, when she sees me, I'm going to bring her food.  She's been a very good patient."
« Last Edit: January 13, 2011, 00:11 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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News: Peregrines / 2009
« Reply #33 on: December 10, 2009, 21:51 »
Sydney, Australia

Taronga Zoo falcon spreads its wings at Balmoral

JUST over six months ago, it was feared Clarkie the Peregrine Falcon would never fly again.

The male Falcon - the world’s fastest animal - was brought to Taronga Zoo’s wildlife hospital in July by the Native Animal Trust Fund after he was found in the Hunter Valley with a broken wing. After two months of veterinary treatment young Clarkie, thought to have just celebrated its first birthday, is now getting flying lessons to prepare him to be released back into the wild.  Last Wednesday, Clarkie enjoyed a lesson at Balmoral Oval, soaring between the bird trainers who were stationed some distance away from each another.

"If we had of just released the Peregrine back at the Hunter Valley without building up its muscle tone and ensuring the bird was able to free fly and use the wing to its full ability, there could have been a very real chance the bird may have perished,’’ bird trainer, Erin Stone said.  Peregrine Falcons can fly in excess of 300 kilometres / hour, their "bullet like bodies’’ allowing them to capture their prey with an incredible amount of force, according to Ms Stone.

She said they were confident Clarkie would be released back into the wild "sooner rather than later’’.


http://mosman-daily.whereilive.com.au/news/story/taronga-zoo-falcon-spreads-its-wings-at-balmoral/

 

I hope this little guy will be very successful when he returns to the wild.

Adding a link to a video: www.sbs.com.au/news/article/1148687/Clarkie-the-falcon-makes-speedy-recovery
« Last Edit: December 10, 2009, 21:55 by Alison »

Offline Alison

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News: USA / California Peregrines
« Reply #34 on: December 17, 2009, 19:10 »
Not good news . . .

More flame retardants found in urban peregrine falcons than their country cousins
Environmental Health News / 15 Dec 2009


Cosmopolitan peregrine falcons in California have higher levels of flame retardants than ones living on the coast or in the country.

Falcons that make their home in some of California's largest cities carry more flame retardant pollutants in them as compared to those that preside in rural areas, finds a study that measured the chemicals in the birds' eggs.

The eggs from peregrine falcons living in the state's biggest urban areas have five times more flame retardants than eggs collected from nests in the countryside or near the Californian coast. The findings suggest that the health of urban raptors is at greater risk from exposure to flame retardants than those that live in less populated environments.

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used in numerous products since the 1970s because they make rugs, furniture and drapery less flammable. Like PCBs, their heavy use, uncontrolled disposal and persistence have caused widespread environmental contamination and concerns over potential health effects in wildlife and humans.

The PBDE chemicals are lipid-loving, and will concentrate through food chains to high levels in top predators. Levels of PBDEs have been increasing in humans and wildlife but decreased production and bans of some types in recent years in North America may reverse this trend in the future.

Peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) feed on other birds like ducks, pigeons and starlings, and are susceptible to accumulation of persistent pollutants because of their position at the top of the food chain. Indeed peregrine falcon populations declined in the 1950s and 1960s because high DDT levels thinned their egg shells, preventing the chicks from hatching.

Though this species is no longer listed as endangered in the US, there may be ongoing threats to their health from exposure to flame retardants. These chemicals are known to affect reproduction and the immune system in other bird species.

In this study, 90 peregrine falcon eggs and 7 chicks were collected during 22 years (between 1986 and 2007) from California cities – including San Diego, San Francisco and Los Angeles (from nests on top of office buildings) – and from the coast and countryside, areas well away from any large urban centers. These samples were analyzed for PBDEs and PCBs.

Concentrations of the PBDEs were five times higher (10.1 parts per million) in eggs from nests in cities than either the coast or countryside (2.38 and 1.61 parts per million, respectively). This is likely because of the higher use and disposal of these chemicals in urban areas. Levels of these flame retardants in the eggs also tripled over the two decades of the study. In contrast, PCB levels in the eggs did not change in any of the regions over the same time period.

Levels in the peregrine falcon eggs were similar to what is known to cause effects on growth and development in other falcon species. The results of this study show that peregrine falcon living in urban areas are at greater risk from exposure to flame retardants than ones living far away from populated areas.


source: http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/newscience/pbde-levels-higher-in-city-than-country-peregrines



Offline Alison

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News: USA / Michigan Peregrines
« Reply #35 on: December 28, 2009, 22:02 »
Popular power plant peregrines are no snow birds
Holland Sentinel / 26 Dec 2009

Peregrine falcons lingering along the lakeshore have birders and biologists wondering if the part-time residents will again remain in Michigan for the winter.

“Peregrine falcons are migratory birds,” said Nik Kalejs, senior wildlife biologist for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. “Typically, they follow other bird species southward when the weather turns colder. These West Michigan birds stuck around last season and seem to want to remain in the area this year, too.”

Last winter, a pair of peregrines remained all season at the J.H. Campbell Complex in Port Sheldon Township, where an artificial nest placed by employees 200-feet up on an emissions stack has been attracting the birds seasonally for eight years. The nest yielded two peregrine chicks this year, with one of the juveniles sharing the territory with its parents well into the fall, another unusual behavior for the highly territorial species.

Tom Kalkman assisted with placing identification leg bands on the chicks as part of a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service program to collect data on the reproductive success, migration routes, and health of the species.

“They’re magnificent birds,” said Kalkman, a Casnovia resident and lab technician at Campbell. “It’s fascinating to think of the fastest animal on the planet residing here in West Michigan — and not wanting to head south for the winter. Obviously, they’re remaining for a reason.”


source:  http://www.hollandsentinel.com/news/x1671986077/Popular-power-plant-peregrines-are-no-snow-birds

 

 

Offline Alison

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News: USA / Virginia Peregrines
« Reply #36 on: December 28, 2009, 22:30 »
Hampton, Virginia

HAMPTON — The sun was out and there wasn't a cloud in the sky. The conditions were ideal for take-off on a Florida-bound flight path.  By the time Edward Clark, president of the Wildlife Center of Virginia, arrived at Grandview Nature Preserve in Hampton with a rare peregrine falcon Tuesday, a crowd of more than 30 people had gathered to see the release.

The falcon was nursed back to health by staff at the Wildlife Center of Virginia in Waynesboro after being picked up injured in Accomack County last month. He wasted no time in flying back into the wild, going north before getting his bearings and heading south for warmer climes.  Clark, who drove from the snowy Shenandoah Valley to release the bird, said conditions were ideal for flight. "It's nice and balmy down here," he said.

He addressed onlookers and then drove deeper into the preserve for the release.  "We might get a bit out of these backyards in case it lands in these backyards and a cat jumps on it. We don't want to have to replace someone's cat," Clark said.

Clark said the peregrine falcon, the fastest animal on Earth, could get back to Accomack County faster than he could drive there.  "But I suspect this bird has Florida on the brain, which is not an altogether bad idea."

When the falcon was picked up, he was underweight, missing some feathers on its left wing and had an eye injury.  The bird was treated at the wildlife center and given flight exercises in one of the center's outdoor flight pens.

"It was generally given supportive care and it healed. In the wild it does not have the luxury of getting better on its own," Clark said.

There are only about 20 known breeding pairs of peregrines in Virginia — in the Hampton Roads and Richmond areas and on the Eastern Shore.


   

« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 22:11 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: USA / Kentucky Peregrines
« Reply #37 on: January 09, 2010, 21:45 »
Artemis, the juvie peregrine falcon being rehabbed at Southwestern High School in Somerset, has recovered and has been released:

Pulaski students participate in program for the birds
Lexington Herald Leader / 1 Jan 2010

Read more: http://www.kentucky.com/2010/01/01/1079060/pulaski-students-participate-in.html#ixzz1ArLFvYVY

SOMERSET — The peregrine falcon, too bruised to fly only three weeks before, flapped away from the thick leather gloves its handler was wearing, circled in the bright, bitterly cold air and headed northeast, disappearing from sight.

That's another success story for the Raptor Rehabilitation Program at Southwestern High School in Pulaski County.

Students in the program help care for injured birds of prey such as hawks, owls and eagles, called raptors, and return them to the wild if possible. The program has taken in more than 1,000 birds since biology teacher Frances Carter started it more than 15 years ago.

Many of the birds must be euthanized, but the number returned to the wild has averaged 44 percent through the years, Carter said.  Other programs and people in the state care for injured raptors, but the facility at Southwestern is the only one in the nation on a high school campus, Carter said. The falcon, which students named Artemis, after the Greek goddess of the hunt, was an arctic bird.

It wasn't clear how she ended up in Kentucky or got hurt, said Noe Avina, 17, a senior who helped care for the bird, feeding her and putting her in a large, mesh-enclosed cage where she could practice flying and build up her wing strength.

Last month, a crowd of students watched as Noe told Artemis good luck and gave her a push to get her airborne. They cheered as she took off. It felt good to get the bird back where she belongs, Noe said. "That, for me, was a big deal."


http://www.kentucky.com/news/state/story/1079060.html

Photos of the release by Pablo Alcala:

 
« Last Edit: January 12, 2011, 15:37 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline carly

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News: USA / Pennsylvania Peregrines
« Reply #38 on: January 12, 2010, 18:22 »
PENNSYLVANIA, USA

Another successful Peregrine Falcon rescue and release

A peregrine falcon was released back into the wild Monday in Lycoming County.  Two sisters are credited with rescuing the falcon last week. The bird is alive thanks to their quick thinking and some help from a rescue clinic. The peregrine falcon was nearly a goner almost one week ago. Now Lucky is healthy again, ready to leave the game commission headquarters near Jersey Shore. Kristina Franklin of the Big Woods Wildlife Rescue Clinic cared for the eight-year-old female after it was injured on the highway in Williamsport.

"It had a head injury, an eye injury and an abrasion on the wing. She just happened to be very strong-willed oriented so therefore she healed quicker," Franklin said.

Lucky's comeback might never have happened if it hadn't been for Marylee and Justina Laird, sisters who were in the right place at the right time.

"I realized it was alive. It started flapping its wings so I turned around and came back," said Marylee Laird.

The Laird sisters came upon the injured falcon on a stretch of Route 220 in Williamsport near the Market Street exit. It was in the middle of the highway. They rushed out into traffic and saved the falcon's life. Now it's free again in the wild.

"We were on the brim of the highway, 30 people are passing and hitting it as we're waiting to get this bird," Marylee Laird recalled. "I didn't care. I knew she needed help and that's all I cared about," added Justina Laird.

The sisters looked on Monday as Franklin let Lucky go, watching proudly as the falcon flew for the first time since they rescued it.

"That felt unbelievable. I loved it. It was," Justina Laird said. "It's good. I'm glad she's back in the wild but I'm definitely. Now I don't know what she's going to be doing. I'm going to worry," Marylee Laird said.


http://www.wnep.com/wnep-lyc-rehabilitated-falcon-released,0,1864119.story
« Last Edit: January 13, 2011, 00:20 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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News: USA / Montana Peregrines
« Reply #39 on: February 01, 2010, 20:13 »
Another state authorizes taking peregrine chicks from the wild:  >:(

FWP seeks comment on peregrine falcon, shed-antler hunting proposals
The Independent Record / 28 January 2010

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks is seeking public comment on proposals for the 2010 peregrine falcon take and on shed-antler hunting on wildlife management areas.

The 2010 proposal on peregrine falcon would authorize five nestlings or fledged peregrines be taken between June 1 and Aug. 31. Only one bird could be collected per successful applicant. Peregrines would not be taken from eastern Montana to help the breeding population there expand, and birds from nests of high value to wildlife viewers would also be excluded.

The proposal on shed-antler hunting on WMAs would create walk-in only access to WMAs for the first three days of shed-antler hunting, beginning the day WMAs open each spring. The proposal would apply to all WMAs that are closed to winter access.

Comments are due by Friday, Feb. 19, and may be sent via e-mail over the FWP Web site at fwp.mt.gov on the Hunting page, or mailed to: FWP – Wildlife Bureau, Attn: Public Comment, P.O. Box 200701, Helena, MT 59620-0701. For more information, check details available on the FWP Web site, or call 444-2612.


http://www.helenair.com/lifestyles/recreation/article_df4c73a0-0bdd-11df-a881-001cc4c002e0.html
« Last Edit: January 13, 2011, 00:19 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines / 2010
« Reply #40 on: February 05, 2010, 19:36 »
Budapest, Hungary

"Wandering falcon" returns to Budapest for winter

A peregrine falcon identified by bird-watchers by the name of Piri has returned to Budapest for the winter and a second peregrine has also been observed, the Hungarian Ornithology and Nature Conservation Society said on Thursday.

Piri used to spend winters in Budapest, finding shelter on the Saint Stephen Basilica in central Budapest, but had not been seen since 2005. The bird was now spotted again, near the parliament building on January 29, and its night shelter has been found on the Basilica.  

A second peregrine has also been observed and identified as a young female born in 2009.

It is not unusual that peregrines move to cities for the winter where they can easily feed with pigeons and other small birds. They usually search for prey from a high perch or from the air and can dive at speeds above 300 kms per hour.

An estimated twenty pairs of peregrines are nesting in Hungary and there are returning birds in several Hungarian cities, including Debrecen, Szeged, Tata and Gyor.


Five years is a long time for Piri not to have been seen.

http://www.caboodle.hu/nc/news/news_archive/single_page/article/11/wandering_f/?cHash=7c26a28efb


Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines / 2010
« Reply #41 on: February 11, 2010, 19:51 »
London, England



THE majestic peregrine falcon has moved into East London.  Two pairs of Britain’s most remarkable bird of prey have set up nests near the north entrance to the Blackwall Tunnel.  Peregrine falcons traditionally nest in coastal areas around Britain—only 20 pairs are believed to be nesting in London.

“They are increasingly moving into cities,” said the RSPB’s Tim Webb. “There is plenty for them to eat here and ledges on tall buildings are similar to their traditional cliff face nesting sites.”

Now the RSPB wants to protect this fledgling group near Canary Wharf and has set up guidelines with the Met Police for anyone who comes across them. “There’s a danger of building maintenance workers facing prosecution by accidentally disturbing nesting peregrines,” Tim added. “We hope the protocol will help people avoid prosecution, allowing peregrines and people to live side by side.”
« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 10:10 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines / 2010
« Reply #42 on: April 15, 2010, 15:55 »
Peregrine Falcon’s nest brings halt to maintenance work on Silver Jubilee Bridge at Halton
Mark Smith / Runcorn and Widnes Weekly News / 15 April 2010

Extensive maintenance work on the Silver Jubilee Bridge has had to be suspended after contractors discovered a peregrine falcon nest.  The birds are protected under the 1981 Wildlife and Countryside Act, meaning that the nest cannot be disturbed. A major £18m overhaul of the bridge has been halted and wildlife experts warn it could be September before it is safe to approach the nest again.  Council leader Tony McDermott said contractors had to be pulled off the project and must now be kept employed while they wait.

Cllr McDermott said: “The falcon is a protected species and hence we are not allowed to touch the nest or even disturb the falcon or its young.  “This means that we will probably have to suspend the current works programme and look for ways to keep the contractor employed.  "This will undoubtedly have time and cost implications for the project which we are trying to determine.”

Chris Collett of the RSPB, warned that the pigeons of Halton should keep their eyes peeled.  He said: “They breed between March and August so it will be safe to approach in September. “Their numbers have been recovering since the 1960s when they were often targeted by egg collectors and also fell victim to DDT – which was later banned.  There are about 1,400 nesting pairs in the UK.”  He said: “They nest on cliffs but are drawn to urban areas because of high buildings and also because of the pigeons. They’re the fastest creature on earth and will fly high before ‘dive bombing’ a pigeon at 200mph.”


This is the way peregrines should be treated . . .  :) halting work until September is a pretty major undertaking.

Offline Alison

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Re: News: USA / New York Peregrines
« Reply #43 on: April 21, 2010, 21:35 »
Female falcon at nest site alone; fate of male remains a mystery (April 2010)
Utica Observer-Dispatch / 20 April 2010



UTICA — When Utica’s resident peregrine falcon couple failed to produce a viable egg last summer, local observers hoped the next mating season would bring them better luck. Instead, the opposite seems to be true.

Maya, the female falcon, has been seen sitting at her M&T Gold Dome Bank nesting site for several weeks. But the last confirmed sighting of her mate, Tor, was nearly two months ago, Spring Farm CARES naturalist Matthew Perry said.  It may be that he’s met an untimely end.

“I’m starting to lean toward the thought that he is gone,” said Perry, who received an unconfirmed report several weeks ago that Tor may have crashed into a Genesee Street window and been injured.

Peregrine falcons typically mate for life and this particular couple is nonmigratory, so it’s unusual that Tor would be missing for so long, Perry said.  Some unofficial falcon watchers believe they’ve seen him since February, however.

“It’s possible he is still alive but isn’t hanging around yet,” Perry said. “We have to remember that this particular pair mated very late.”

The falcons, who have nested unsuccessfully on the bank building for two years, laid their first egg on June 4, 2008, and their second on June 6, 2009, Perry said. In between the two seasons, state Department of Environmental Conservation officials installed a gravel-filled nesting box on the bank’s roof ledge and removed pigeon wire to make it more hospitable for the couple. 

Perry said Tor’s death would not necessarily put an end to Maya’s hopes of becoming a mother, however.

“If Tor is gone, she may hook up with another male coming through the area,” he said. “There was a record number of peregrines that hatched last year in the state. That means there are a lot of peregrines that don’t have a territory that will be in the general area of New York state.”

He added that Maya finding “a new man” would be the clearest indication that Tor has died. If she just leaves the nest in coming weeks, it could mean that she’s single again or that the couple simply found a new nesting site somewhere else.

Both birds were seen together in the city as recently as mid-December, Perry said.


source: http://www.uticaod.com/news/x43863724/Female-falcon-at-nest-site-alone-fate-of-male-remains-a-mystery
« Last Edit: January 28, 2014, 20:57 by The Peregrine Chick »

Offline Alison

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News: USA / Oregon Peregrines
« Reply #44 on: April 24, 2010, 16:34 »
Rare Falcon Slowly Recovering from Gunshot (April 2010)

A rare falcon is recovering in Sisters. "The left wing was broken between the shoulder and elbow, and there was a number of shotgun pellets in there that caused the break," says Gary Landers, owner of Wild Wings Raptor Rehabilitation Center.

The adult male Peregrine Falcon is believed to be one of the only pair of falcons in Central Oregon. He was found earlier this month in Culver, illegally shot in the wing. The falcon underwent surgery at Broken Top Veterinary Clinic, two rods are inside its wing holding the bone together. "The healing is progressing so we're guarded but we're hopeful, the pins will come out of the bone in another week and at that point I'll start doing physical therapy to stretch the wing out to get its full extension and we'll start progressing the bird on flying," says Landers.

The Peregrine Falcon is unique, just taken off the endangered species list, it's slowly making a come back here in Central Oregon. Right now is nesting season meaning there very well could be some eggs laid. "Potentially whoever shot this bird if it's unrecoverable and this bird has to be euthanized because it can't be released it's not only this bird that's killed, it's however many eggs were laid because the female is not going to be capable of feeding the chicks," says Landers.

The Peregrine Falcon is the fastest animal in the world, it can dive at 200 miles an hour. "When you have a broken wing on a bird like this it's absolutely critical that we get everything correct before release because this bird takes extreme G Force while it's hunting," says Landers.

If recovery is successful, the falcon will be released in a few months.


Hoping for a complete recovery for this little tiercel, and that the person who did this will be found and charged accordingly.

There is a photo with the article.

http://kohd.com/page/171243
« Last Edit: January 11, 2011, 17:58 by The Peregrine Chick »