Author Topic: News: Peregrines  (Read 37067 times)

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Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #225 on: September 09, 2018, 09:45 »
September 8 update on Phoenix. What a sweet and beautiful falcon she is.



Today, Ferdinand Baer took our Phoenix to the veterinarian again for pain treatment. Unfortunately, it turned out that the skin on the wing also shows burns. But at least she was able to keep down the food she was given yesterday. Her condition continues to worry us greatly. In this context, a heartfelt thank you to the practice of Dr. Cronenberg, from whom Phoenix receives medication.

And a short video:

https://video.mittelbayerische.de/region/regensburg/vogelschuetzer-bangen-um-phoenix-23815-vid61708.html

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #226 on: September 09, 2018, 09:49 »
This morning's update on Phoenix, which is an encouraging one:

The fate of our falcon, Phoenix, is very important to many. A king of the skies is robbed from one second to the next of his vital flying ability. Therefore, I am very pleased to publish today's picture of her. She is agile and her appetite is increasing. This gives reason to hope that it could not have come to heavy gas poisoning.



Offline carly

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #227 on: September 10, 2018, 07:48 »
Very encouraging!!   Thanks again.

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #228 on: September 12, 2018, 10:08 »
Update on Phoenix this morning, September 12:

Meanwhile, our Phoenix was allowed to move into an outdoor enclosure. However, she still needs a lot of rest to recover from the hardship and stress she has endured. Tomorrow, she will visit the veterinarian again to check the status of her health. It is very positive that she eats well independently, and has already gained 90 grams of weight. However, she has to reach over 800 grams, and she is not there yet.

 

She has made an incredible amount of progress in just ten days. I know she will be in care for a very long time, but it is very clear that she is determined to recover. I believe she can do it.

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #229 on: September 21, 2018, 15:00 »
On September 14, there was word that Phoenix's visit to the veterinarian had gone well, and that she was continuing to improve.

On September 19, the news was not so good. Phoenix's condition was described as stable, but she was not eating well. She was being examined regularly, and those caring for her continued to hope that she would recover.

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #230 on: September 21, 2018, 15:18 »
This morning brought the worst possible news from Regensburg.

Unfortunately, today I have sad news. Last night, the health of our Phoenix deteriorated rapidly. She could no longer keep food down, and became weaker and weaker. Ferdinand, our head of the bird station, drove her immediately to the vet, but there was no way to save her. There were, as we feared at first, severe internal injuries in the gastrointestinal tract, which were probably caused by the heat, or even by toxins or chemical burns. This, of course, is very bitter, especially for those who have been intensively concerned about the recovery of Phoenix. Thanks again to all of you who have generously sent donations to us. Such setbacks hurt, but do not dampen our zeal and commitment to nature and animals in emergency situations. We cannot allow ourselves to grieve for a very long time, because the next patients are waiting for our help. Thank you for your interest and your support!!

I had so much hoped that Phoenix was going to recover. This beautiful and courageous peregrine fought so valiantly to survive, and for a while she seemed to be winning her battle.  :'( :'(

Offline carly

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #231 on: September 21, 2018, 21:36 »
How very sad.  Rest in peace Phoenix  :'(

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #232 on: September 27, 2018, 11:29 »
This one I can't put on the Forum, the photos are just too lovely & large, you need to see them on the Nat Geo website!!


Inside a Sheikh's Plan to Protect the World's Fastest Animal
National Geographic - October 2018
Raising and training falcons in captivity can help conserve these beloved symbols of the Arabian Peninsula.
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/10/protecting-falcons-worlds-fastest-animal/


Offline Jazzerkins

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #233 on: September 28, 2018, 18:08 »
That was a great read, TPC!  What gorgeous pictures of gorgeous birds.

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #234 on: November 17, 2018, 22:41 »
An interesting article on Greg Septon, who has been the driving force behind the restoration of peregrines in Wisconsin for several decades.

Decades after getting it started, Racine native still guides state's peregrine falcon recovery



Greg Septon, founder of the Wisconsin peregrine falcon recovery project, holds a male peregrine chick at a We Energies plant in Port Washington. The chick was the 1,000th peregrine Septon has banded in Wisconsin over the last 30 years.

(Photo: Paul A. Smith)

https://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/story/news/2018/11/16/peregrine-falcon-recovery-wisconsin-racine-natives-life-work/1760759002/

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #235 on: November 18, 2018, 16:39 »
Set your PVRs folks!

Nova - World's Fastest Animal - The Peregrine Falcon
Wednesday, Nov 21 @ 8pm CST


See the world through the eyes of nature’s fastest animal: the peregrine falcon. Though once perilously endangered in the U.S., this spectacular predator is now thriving again in American cities and on every continent but Antarctica. What is the secret to its predatory prowess? To find out, follow a young family of peregrines in urban Chicago as the chicks hatch and learn from their parents to fly and hunt. And join expert falconer Lloyd Buck as he trains a captive peregrine and puts its hunting skills to the test. What’s the secret behind the peregrine falcon’s blistering speed, able to reach nearly 200 mph?

link to Nova website = https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/video/worlds-fastest-animal/

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #236 on: November 20, 2018, 10:56 »
Set your PVRs folks!

Nova - World's Fastest Animal - The Peregrine Falcon
Wednesday, Nov 21 @ 8pm CST


See the world through the eyes of nature’s fastest animal: the peregrine falcon. Though once perilously endangered in the U.S., this spectacular predator is now thriving again in American cities and on every continent but Antarctica. What is the secret to its predatory prowess? To find out, follow a young family of peregrines in urban Chicago as the chicks hatch and learn from their parents to fly and hunt. And join expert falconer Lloyd Buck as he trains a captive peregrine and puts its hunting skills to the test. What’s the secret behind the peregrine falcon’s blistering speed, able to reach nearly 200 mph?

link to Nova website = https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/video/worlds-fastest-animal/

That sounds interesting . . . probably will not be available here. I am wondering if the "young family of peregrines in urban Chicago'" refers to Steve and Linda, who raised their chicks on a Chicago apartment balcony from 2015 - 2017. If so, Dacey Arashiba, who used to live there, moved away. Steve and Linda moved elsewhere to another apartment balcony which they had used in the past. They had two chicks this year, who were doing very well until, very close to fledging, both chicks were found dead on the balcony. I strongly suspect that this was not accidental.  :'(

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #237 on: December 03, 2018, 23:23 »
Had a little springtime mystery peregrine fun on the weekend.  The photographer that spotted Bridget at this time last year sent me a photo of another banded bird.  Not ours, but it is still fun tracking down who is who :)

The who was Frisco from Minnesota and here's what I found out about him.
  • 2006 - hatched from a wild nest at the Lock & Dam nestsite in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Parents were unbanded birds so can't give you any background on them.
  • 2009 - nested with Gypsy (2005 Sartell Paper Mill, MN) at the Cedar Riverside Apartment building in Minneapolis - 3 chick fledged: 2 males, 1 female.
  • 2010 - returned to nest with Gypsy but at a new nestbox nearby on the Riverview Terrace Building in Minneapolis - 3 chicks fledged: 2 males, 1 female.
  • 2011 - returned & after checking out the University of Minnesota campus, nested again with Gypsy at Riverview Terrace - 3 chicks fledged: 2 males, 1 female.
  • 2012 - returned to nest on the Mayo Building at the University of Minnesota campus - April mate was Gypsy, but come banding time in early June had new mate Seapro (2009 Port Washington, WI) - 4 chicks:  1 male, 3 females.
  • 2013 - returned to nest with Seapro at Mayo Building/University of Minnesota - 3 chicks: 1 male, 2 females.
  • 2014 - returned to nest with Seapro at Mayo Building/University of Minnesota - 3 chicks: 3 females.
  • 2015 - returned to nest with Seapro at Mayo Building/University of Minnesota - 4 chicks: 1 male, 3 females.
  • 2016 - returned to nest with Seapro at Mayo Building/University of Minnesota - 4 chicks: 3 males, 1 female.
  • 2017 - returned to nest with Seapro but at new site at Cedar Riverside Apartment building in Minneapolis - 4 chicks: 2 males, 2 females.
  • 2018 - according to the notes he was recovered twice first in February, then again in March both times in a "near moribund condition", perhaps due to some kind of toxicity, he was released both times near where he'd been recovered.  He was not spotted at any of his usual haunts through the breeding season & no one reported seeing him ... until November when he was spotted twice on Padre Island by the photographer looking hale and hearty!
For those who were counting - he's twelve years old, has had two mates and produced/raised (as of 2017), 31 chicks that fledged - 14 males, 17 females.
A nice impressive record by anyone's standards!

He was one of the first birds Jackie banded and has always been a favourite of hers ... she was thrilled to hear he hadn't just survived but that he appears to be thriving down south.  Hopefully that means she will be seeing him again next spring in Minnesota.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #238 on: December 03, 2018, 23:24 »
The who was Frisco from Minnesota and here's what I found out about him.

Here's what Jackie had to say on the Midwest Peregrine Society Facebook page:

State coordinators get phone calls at all hours of the day (and sometimes night), throughout the year. During the "off season" October-February, most of those phone calls can be dreaded, because of the probability of a bird being found injured during their migratory wanderings.

However, today one of those phone calls turned out to be a happy call. Manitoba coordinator Tracy Maconachie had received word from a photographer in Texas of a banded peregrine. When he sent the photo to Tracy, she immediately looked the band up in our data base and discovered that Frisco, 2006 hatch from Minnesota, was alive and well! This was the first time we learned of his winter wanderings, ~1400 miles from home.

This was especially good news since Frisco had been brought to The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota on two separate occasions in 2018 during the late winter, with every indication of being poisoned. A tiercel peregrine was identified on Frisco's traditional nesting territory this summer, but a full band confirmation couldn't be made, and no further sightings had been done.

While we wait for approval from the photographer in Texas to use his photo, we thought we would post some images of Frisco from his banding on May 26, 2006 as well as his defensive flying in 2009 when on territory in Minneapolis.

We want to thank all of the photographers who submit images to us. The information greatly enhances our knowledge of the birds. Keep the photos coming!

Offline Alison

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Re: News: Peregrines
« Reply #239 on: December 08, 2018, 14:32 »
December 4, 2018

A short update on Frisco from the Midwest Peregrine Society:

Just a follow-up post of the photo by Joe Hernandez of Texas, who informed us of "Frisco" b/g K/13, 2006 fledge from Lock and Dam, at his layover in North Padre Island. Whether Frisco will stay at Padre the entire winter or travel farther south, no one really knows. We just hope he returns safely to nest in Minnesota in 2019.

This update also has a beautiful photo of Frisco, a very handsome tiercel.

https://www.facebook.com/354352871260525/photos/a.359308187431660/2359148080780984/?type=3&theater

Frisco is the father of Genie, Triumph's mate at the Multifoods site (and former mate of Younger), and also the father of Hattie, the resident female at the Mayo Clinic.